Understanding the determinants of Australian hospital nurses' hand hygiene decisions following the implementation of a national hand hygiene initiative

White, Katherine M., Starfelt, Louise C., Jimmieson, Nerina L., Campbell, Megan, Graves, Nicholas, Barnett, Adrian G., Cockshaw, Wendell, Gee, Phillip, Page, Katie, Martin, Elizabeth, Brain, David and Paterson, David (2015) Understanding the determinants of Australian hospital nurses' hand hygiene decisions following the implementation of a national hand hygiene initiative. Health Education Research, 30 6: 959-970. doi:10.1093/her/cyv057


Author White, Katherine M.
Starfelt, Louise C.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Campbell, Megan
Graves, Nicholas
Barnett, Adrian G.
Cockshaw, Wendell
Gee, Phillip
Page, Katie
Martin, Elizabeth
Brain, David
Paterson, David
Title Understanding the determinants of Australian hospital nurses' hand hygiene decisions following the implementation of a national hand hygiene initiative
Journal name Health Education Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-1153
1465-3648
Publication date 2015-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/her/cyv057
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 30
Issue 6
Start page 959
End page 970
Total pages 12
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract Hand hygiene is the primary measure in hospitals to reduce the spread of infections, with nurses experiencing the greatest frequency of patient contact. The ‘5 critical moments’ of hand hygiene initiative has been implemented in hospitals across Australia, accompanied by awareness-raising, staff training and auditing. The aim of this study was to understand the determinants of nurses’ hand hygiene decisions, using an extension of a common health decision-making model, the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), to inform future health education strategies to increase compliance. Nurses from 50 Australian hospitals (n = 2378) completed standard TPB measures (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control [PBC], intention) and the extended variables of group norm, risk perceptions (susceptibility, severity) and knowledge (subjective, objective) at Time 1, while a sub-sample (n = 797) reported their hand hygiene behaviour 2 weeks later. Regression analyses identified subjective norm, PBC, group norm, subjective knowledge and risk susceptibility as the significant predictors of nurses’ hand hygiene intentions, with intention and PBC predicting their compliance behaviour. Rather than targeting attitudes which are already very favourable among nurses, health education strategies should focus on normative influences and perceptions of control and risk in efforts to encourage hand hygiene adherence.
Keyword Health-Care Workers
Planned Behavior
Group Norms
Perceptions
Prediction
Adherence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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