Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

Haque, Ashraful, Easton, Anna, Smith, Debbie, O'Garra, Anne, Van Rooijen, Nico, Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana, Titball, Richard W. and Bancroft, Gregory J. (2006) Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 193 3: 370-379. doi:10.1086/498983


Author Haque, Ashraful
Easton, Anna
Smith, Debbie
O'Garra, Anne
Van Rooijen, Nico
Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana
Titball, Richard W.
Bancroft, Gregory J.
Title Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection
Formatted title
Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection
Journal name Journal of Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1899
1537-6613
Publication date 2006-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/498983
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 193
Issue 3
Start page 370
End page 379
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Antigen-specific T cells are important sources of interferon (IFN)-γ for acquired immunity to intracellular pathogens, but they can also produce IFN-γ directly via a "bystander" activation pathway in response to proinflammatory cytokines. We investigated the in vivo role of cytokine- versus antigen-mediated T cell activation in resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-12, and IL-18 were essential for initial bacterial control in infected mice. B. pseudomallei infection rapidly generated a potent IFN-γ response from natural killer (NK) cells, NK T cells, conventional T cells, and other cell types within 16 h after infection, in an IL-12- and IL-18-dependent manner. However, early T cell- and NK cell-derived IFN-γ responses were functionally redundant in cell depletion studies, with IFN-γ produced by other cell types, such as major histocompatibility complex class IIint F4/80+ macrophages being sufficient for initial resistance. In contrast, B. pseudomallei-specific CD4+ T cells played an important role during the later stage of infection. Thus, the T cell response to primary B. pseudomallei infection is biphasic, an early cytokine-induced phase in which T cells appear to be functionally redundant for initial bacterial clearance, followed by a later antigen-induced phase in which B. pseudomallei-specific T cells, in particular CD4+ T cells, are important for host resistance.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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