Combining vaccination and postexposure CpG therapy provides optimal protection against lethal sepsis in a biodefense model of human melioidosis

Easton, Anna, Haque, Ashraful, Chu, Karen, Patel, Natasha, Lukaszewski, Roman A., Krieg, Arthur M., Titball, Richard W. and Bancroft, Gregory J. (2011) Combining vaccination and postexposure CpG therapy provides optimal protection against lethal sepsis in a biodefense model of human melioidosis. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 204 4: 636-644. doi:10.1093/infdis/jir301


Author Easton, Anna
Haque, Ashraful
Chu, Karen
Patel, Natasha
Lukaszewski, Roman A.
Krieg, Arthur M.
Titball, Richard W.
Bancroft, Gregory J.
Title Combining vaccination and postexposure CpG therapy provides optimal protection against lethal sepsis in a biodefense model of human melioidosis
Journal name Journal of Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1899
1537-6613
Publication date 2011-08-15
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/infdis/jir301
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 204
Issue 4
Start page 636
End page 644
Total pages 9
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a major cause of lethal sepsis and morbidity in endemic areas of Southeast Asia and a potential bioterrorism threat. We have used susceptible BALB/c mice to evaluate the potential of targeting vaccination and generic immunotherapy to the lung for optimal protection against respiratory challenge. Intranasal vaccination with live attenuated B. pseudomallei increased survival and induced interferon-γ - secreting T cells in the lung. Intranasal delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides also provided significant protection; however, combining preexposure vaccination with CpG treatment at the time of infection or up to 18 hours after infection, provided significantly greater protection than either treatment alone. This combination prolonged survival, decreased bacterial loads by >1000-fold, and delayed the onset of sepsis. This novel approach may be applicable to other potential biodefense agents for which existing countermeasures are not fully effective.
Keyword Immunology
Infectious Diseases
Microbiology
Immunology
Infectious Diseases
Microbiology
IMMUNOLOGY
INFECTIOUS DISEASES
MICROBIOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID RD013-0931417
UO1 AI061363-05
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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