Malaria vaccine research: lessons from 2008/9

Haque, Ashraful and Good, Michael F. (2009) Malaria vaccine research: lessons from 2008/9. Future Microbiology, 4 6: 649-654. doi:10.2217/fmb.09.43


Author Haque, Ashraful
Good, Michael F.
Title Malaria vaccine research: lessons from 2008/9
Journal name Future Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1746-0913
1746-0921
Publication date 2009-08-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2217/fmb.09.43
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 4
Issue 6
Start page 649
End page 654
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Future Medicine
Language eng
Abstract Vaccination remains a crucial component of any initiative to control or eradicate malaria. With increasing reports of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, and malaria parasite resistance to first-line drugs, it is clear that the development of an effective malaria vaccine is an urgent requirement for the improvement of global human health. This article highlights malaria vaccine research-related discoveries from 2008/9 to suggest that the time is now ripe for researchers to develop malaria vaccines that target many antigens from multiple stages of the parasite's lifecycle. We also call for greater bidirectional information transfer between preclinical and clinical trials, to facilitate more efficient improvement of malaria vaccine candidates.
Keyword Blood stage
Liver stage
Malaria
Recombinant vaccine
T cell
Vaccine
Whole organism vaccine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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