Diabetes and the female disadvantage

Woodward, Mark, Peters, Sanne A.E. and Huxley, Rachel R. (2015) Diabetes and the female disadvantage. Women's Health, 11 6: 833-839. doi:10.2217/whe.15.67


Author Woodward, Mark
Peters, Sanne A.E.
Huxley, Rachel R.
Title Diabetes and the female disadvantage
Journal name Women's Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1745-5065
1745-5057
Publication date 2015-11-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.2217/whe.15.67
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 11
Issue 6
Start page 833
End page 839
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Future Medicine
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
Abstract We have produced compelling evidence that women are subject to a higher relative increase in their risk of coronary heart disease and stroke following a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Thus, in terms of vascular risk, diabetes confers a female disadvantage. This excess risk could be due to three main factors. First, it is conceivable that this is merely a mathematical artifact caused by the relatively low background rate for cardiovascular diseases among women, compared with men. Second, it could be due to women receiving poorer care following their diagnosis of diabetes than men; for instance, due to physician bias. Third, certain underlying biological differences in women and men, most likely related to the distribution of body fat, could explain this female disadvantage.
Formatted abstract
We have produced compelling evidence that women are subject to a higher relative increase in their risk of coronary heart disease and stroke following a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Thus, in terms of vascular risk, diabetes confers a female disadvantage. This excess risk could be due to three main factors. First, it is conceivable that this is merely a mathematical artifact caused by the relatively low background rate for cardiovascular diseases among women, compared with men. Second, it could be due to women receiving poorer care following their diagnosis of diabetes than men; for instance, due to physician bias. Third, certain underlying biological differences in women and men, most likely related to the distribution of body fat, could explain this female disadvantage.
Keyword Coronary heart disease
Diabetes
Stroke
Women
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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