Relative role of accommodation zones in controlling stratal architectural variability and facies distribution: Insights from the Fushan Depression, South China Sea

Liu, Entao, Wang, Hua, Li, Yuan, Leonard, Nicole D., Feng, Yuexing, Pan, Songqi and Xia, Cunyin (2015) Relative role of accommodation zones in controlling stratal architectural variability and facies distribution: Insights from the Fushan Depression, South China Sea. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 68 Part A: 219-239. doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2015.08.027

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Author Liu, Entao
Wang, Hua
Li, Yuan
Leonard, Nicole D.
Feng, Yuexing
Pan, Songqi
Xia, Cunyin
Title Relative role of accommodation zones in controlling stratal architectural variability and facies distribution: Insights from the Fushan Depression, South China Sea
Journal name Marine and Petroleum Geology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-8172
1873-4073
Publication date 2015-12-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2015.08.027
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 68
Issue Part A
Start page 219
End page 239
Total pages 21
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract In sedimentary basins, a better understanding of the controlling effect of accommodation/transfer zones on stratal architecture and facies distribution can improve the success rate of locating hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Fushan Depression is a half-graben rift sub-basin located in the southeast of the Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea. In this study, comparative analysis of seismic reflection, palaeogeomorphology, fault activity and depositional facies distribution indicates that three different types of inner-basin slopes (i.e. multi-level step-fault slope in the western area, slope flexure zone in the accommodation zone area and gentle slope in the eastern area) were developed along the southern slope of the Fushan Depression, together with a large-scale accommodation zone located at the intersection of the western and eastern fault systems. Further analysis shows that the accommodation zone played an important role in controlling not only stratal architectural variability in the southern slope but also depositional facies distribution in the accommodation zone area. During the high-stand stage, the deposition of depositional systems was mainly controlled by sediment supply and the NW-trending transfer faults. Major drainage systems entered the Fushan Depression through the accommodation zone along the direction of sediment supply, and sedimentary flow paths were parallel to the accommodation zone axis with sedimentary flows constrained to the adjacent areas of the NW-trending transfer faults. By contrast, during the low-stand stage, the transfer faults had little control over depositional facies distribution, and the sublacustrine fan sediments diverted away from the accommodation zone and flew down along the northeast, oblique to the accommodation zone axis. The flow division in the lowstand stage might be greatly influenced by flow type and topography. In addition, the accommodation zone area demonstrated unique hydrocarbon accumulation models different from the western and eastern areas, suggesting that the future exploration should be conducted at different levels in the Fushan Depression.
Keyword Accommodation zones
Stratal architectural variability
Facies distribution
Controlling effect
Fushan Depression
Beibuwan Basin
South China Sea
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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