Policing and collective efficacy: the relative importance of police effectiveness, procedural justice and the obligation to obey police

Sargeant, Elise (2015) Policing and collective efficacy: the relative importance of police effectiveness, procedural justice and the obligation to obey police. Policing and Society, 1-14. doi:10.1080/10439463.2015.1122008


Author Sargeant, Elise
Title Policing and collective efficacy: the relative importance of police effectiveness, procedural justice and the obligation to obey police
Journal name Policing and Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-2728
1043-9463
Publication date 2015-12-21
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10439463.2015.1122008
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract The role of police in building collective efficacy remains an unanswered question. This paper employs a sample of 4403 people living in 148 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia, to examine the relationship between perceptions of police and collective efficacy. Results indicate that even when controlling for neighbourhood compositional and structural characteristics, trust in police effectiveness and procedural justice are the key variables explaining collective efficacy. Although trust in police effectiveness and procedural justice do not predict neighbourhood differences in collective efficacy, they do explain variations in perceptions of collective efficacy among those residents in a given neighbourhood. These findings reveal that when people trust the police are effective and procedurally just, they are more likely to view their neighbourhoods as collectively efficacious. This research suggests that police can help to encourage collective efficacy, and potentially reduce crime, by communicating their effectiveness and delivering procedural justice to citizens.
Keyword Collective efficacy
Police legitimacy
Trust in police effectiveness
Trust in procedural justice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Jan 2016, 10:37:09 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)