Post-traumatic stress disorder: Findings from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being

Creamer, M., Burgess, P. and McFarlane, A. C. (2001) Post-traumatic stress disorder: Findings from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being. Psychological Medicine, 31 7: 1237-1247. doi:10.1017/S0033291701004287


Author Creamer, M.
Burgess, P.
McFarlane, A. C.
Title Post-traumatic stress disorder: Findings from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being
Journal name Psychological Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0033-2917
Publication date 2001-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291701004287
Volume 31
Issue 7
Start page 1237
End page 1247
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cambridge, U.K.
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 321204 Mental Health
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Background. We report on the epidemiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the Australian community, including information on lifetime exposure to trauma, 12-month prevalence of PTSD, sociodemographic correlates and co-morbidity. Methods. Data were obtained from a stratified sample of 10641 participants as part of the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being. A modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to determine the presence of PTSD, as well as other DSM-IV anxiety, affective and substance use disorders. Results. The estimated 12-month prevalence of PTSD was 1.33%, which is considerably lower than that found in comparable North American studies. Although females were at greater risk than males within the subsample of those who had experienced trauma, the large gender differences noted in some recent epidemiological research were not replicated. Prevalence was elevated among the never married and previously married respondents, and was lower among those aged over 55. For both men and women, rape and sexual molestation were the traumatic events most likely to be associated with PTSD. A high level of Axis I co-morbidity was found among those persons with PTSD Conclusions. PTSD is a highly prevalent disorder in the Australian community and is routinely associated with high rates of anxiety, depression and substance disorders. Future research is needed to investigate rates among other populations outside the North American continent.
Keyword Psychiatry
Psychology
Psychology, Clinical
International Diagnostic Interview
Comorbidity-survey
Area Survey
Prevalence
Community
Events
Population
Sample
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 22:37:28 EST