Chronic disease risks and use of a smartphone application during a physical activity and dietary intervention in Australian truck drivers

Gilson, Nicholas D, Pavey, Toby G., Vandelanotte, Corneel, Duncan, Mitch J., Gomersall, Sjaan R., Trost, Stewart G. and Brown, Wendy J. (2016) Chronic disease risks and use of a smartphone application during a physical activity and dietary intervention in Australian truck drivers. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 1: 91-93. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12501


Author Gilson, Nicholas D
Pavey, Toby G.
Vandelanotte, Corneel
Duncan, Mitch J.
Gomersall, Sjaan R.
Trost, Stewart G.
Brown, Wendy J.
Title Chronic disease risks and use of a smartphone application during a physical activity and dietary intervention in Australian truck drivers
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1753-6405
1326-0200
Publication date 2016-02-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12501
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 40
Issue 1
Start page 91
End page 93
Total pages 3
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This study examined chronic disease risks and the use of a smartphone activity tracking application during an intervention in Australian truck drivers (April-October 2014).

Methods: Forty-four men (mean age=47.5 [SD 9.8] years) completed baseline health measures, and were subsequently offered access to a free wrist-worn activity tracker and smartphone application (Jawbone UP) to monitor step counts and dietary choices during a 20-week intervention. Chronic disease risks were evaluated against guidelines; weekly step count and dietary logs registered by drivers in the application were analysed to evaluate use of the Jawbone UP.

Results:
Chronic disease risks were high (e.g. 97% high waist circumference [≥94 cm]). Eighteen drivers (41%) did not start the intervention; smartphone technical barriers were the main reason for drop out. Across 20-weeks, drivers who used the Jawbone UP logged step counts for an average of 6 [SD 1] days/week; mean step counts remained consistent across the intervention (weeks 1–4=8,743[SD 2,867] steps/day; weeks 17–20=8,994[SD 3,478] steps/day). The median number of dietary logs significantly decreased from start (17 [IQR 38] logs/weeks) to end of the intervention (0 [IQR 23] logs/week; p<0.01); the median proportion of healthy diet choices relative to total diet choices logged increased across the intervention (weeks 1–4=38[IQR 21]%; weeks 17–20=58[IQR 18]%).

Conclusions: Step counts were more successfully monitored than dietary choices in those drivers who used the Jawbone UP.

Implications:
Smartphone technology facilitated active living and healthy dietary choices, but also prohibited intervention engagement in a number of these high-risk Australian truck drivers.
Keyword Chronic diseases
Smartphones
Truck drivers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 07 Jan 2016, 22:02:15 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences