The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction & architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo

Farris, Dominic James, Lichtwark, Glen, Brown, Nicholas A.T. and Cresswell, Andrew (2016) The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction & architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo. Journal of Experimental Biology, 219 4: 528-534. doi:10.1242/jeb.126854

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Author Farris, Dominic James
Lichtwark, Glen
Brown, Nicholas A.T.
Cresswell, Andrew
Title The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction & architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo
Formatted title
The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction & architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo
Journal name Journal of Experimental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0949
1477-9145
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1242/jeb.126854
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 219
Issue 4
Start page 528
End page 534
Total pages 7
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher The Company of Biologists
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
1314 Physiology
1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
1104 Aquatic Science
1312 Molecular Biology
1103 Animal Science and Zoology
1109 Insect Science
Abstract Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues.
Formatted abstract
Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine if human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEE) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEE's. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage (EMA) early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, EMA did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues.
Keyword Biomechanics
Ultrsound
Fascicle
Elastic
Moment arm
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 05 Jan 2016, 20:20:21 EST by Dominic James Farris on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences