Jung and Levinas: An ethics of mediation

Gray, Frances Jung and Levinas: An ethics of mediation. Abingdon, Oxon and New York, NY: Routledge, 2016.

Author Gray, Frances
Title Jung and Levinas: An ethics of mediation
Place of Publication Abingdon, Oxon and New York, NY
Publisher Routledge
Publication year 2016
Sub-type Research book (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Series Research in Analytical Psychology and Jungian Studies Series
ISBN 9780415816823
9780203585382
Language eng
Start page 1
End page 146
Total number of pages 146
Year available 2016
Subjects 3200 Psychology
Abstract/Summary This book brings C.G. Jung into conversation with the French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, taking a radical view of post-modernist theory which, the author argues, is relentlessly introverted. Frances Gray presents completely new research which extends analytical psychology into the world of dispute resolution in mediation within a deeply philosophical framework. Arguing that mediation is a therapeutics that entails a psycho-social archaeology which, in turn, requires recognition of the foundational roles of sex/gender, time and narrative in inter-subjective relationships, this book develops Jung's approach to projection as an ethical process that assumes the presence of a sex/gendered Other. Chapters explore the possibility of a psycho-social archaeology through development of the argument that a radical turn to the fundamentals of our own consciousnesses can open up a landscape on which we begin to fashion the moral courage necessary for the practice of alternative dispute resolution in mediation. This book highlights Jung's contention that withdrawal of projection is a fundamentally moral endeavour and that although Levinas' face of the Other can be seen as a way of acknowledging the Otherness of the Other, there are limits to its application in Jungian thinking. This book maintains that the face of the Other is critical to any moral encounter and, above all, brings us to the transformational possibilities of the process of dispute resolution in mediation. Jung and Levinas will appeal to researchers, students and practitioners of analytical psychology, dispute resolution, applied ethics, conflict studies and transformation.
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This book brings C.G. Jung into conversation with the French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, taking a radical view of post-modernist theory which, the author argues, is relentlessly introverted. Frances Gray presents completely new research which extends analytical psychology into the world of dispute resolution in mediation within a deeply philosophical framework. Arguing that mediation is a therapeutics that entails a psycho-social archaeology which, in turn, requires recognition of the foundational roles of sex/gender, time and narrative in inter-subjective relationships, this book develops Jung’s approach to projection as an ethical process that assumes the presence of a sex/gendered Other.

Chapters explore the possibility of a psycho-social archaeology through development of the argument that a radical turn to the fundamentals of our own consciousnesses can open up a landscape on which we begin to fashion the moral courage necessary for the practice of alternative dispute resolution in mediation. This book highlights Jung’s contention that withdrawal of projection is a fundamentally moral endeavour and that although Levinas’ face of the Other can be seen as a way of acknowledging the Otherness of the Other, there are limits to its application in Jungian thinking. This book maintains that the face of the Other is critical to any moral encounter and, above all, brings us to the transformational possibilities of the process of dispute resolution in mediation.
Q-Index Code A1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Details of book available from publisher's website: https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415816823

 
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Created: Tue, 05 Jan 2016, 00:57:33 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry