Contextualizing, orchestrating and learning for leading: The praxis and particularity of educational leadership practices

Grootenboer, Peter and Hardy, Ian (2015) Contextualizing, orchestrating and learning for leading: The praxis and particularity of educational leadership practices. Educational Management Administration & Leadership, 45 3: 402-418. doi:10.1177/1741143215595418


Author Grootenboer, Peter
Hardy, Ian
Title Contextualizing, orchestrating and learning for leading: The praxis and particularity of educational leadership practices
Journal name Educational Management Administration & Leadership   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1741-1432
1741-1440
Publication date 2015-12-23
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1741143215595418
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 45
Issue 3
Start page 402
End page 418
Total pages 17
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract The importance of leadership for improving educational outcomes in schools has been widely promoted. However, the nature of leadership practices, in context, has received less attention in the educational leadership literature. In this article, we present a case study of the specific leadership practices that developed in one school site serving the learning needs of students in a complex, diverse, low socio-economic community in south-east Queensland, Australia. Rather than focusing on the person/role of ‘the leader’, or various leadership qualities/traits, we examine the nature and particularity of the leadership practices as praxis, across a variety of roles and dispositions, as developed within the school. To help make sense of the praxis and particularity of educational leadership practices, we draw upon recent neo-Aristotelian practice theory to reveal the specific actions (‘doings’), dialogue (‘sayings’) and relationships (‘relatings’), which constituted leadership-in-practice, as praxis. These ‘doing’, ‘sayings’ and ‘relatings’ for praxis were evident in: formal leadership practices responsive to the context and history of the particular school site; formal and informal leadership practices involved in establishing a ‘leadership group’ within the school to address students’ needs, and; and informal leadership practices focused on cultivating teacher learning for student learning. Such an approach does not simply reinforce sedimented notions of what constitutes ‘educational leadership’, but sheds new light upon the nature of ‘leading practices for praxis’.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 04 Jan 2016, 18:57:31 EST by Claire Backhouse on behalf of School of Education