Hydrodynamic evaluation of aortic cardiopulmonary bypass cannulae using particle image velocimetry

McDonald, C. I., Bolle, E., Lang, H. F., Ribolzi, C., Thomson, B., Tansley, G. D., Fraser, J. F. and Gregory, S. D. (2016) Hydrodynamic evaluation of aortic cardiopulmonary bypass cannulae using particle image velocimetry. Perfusion (United Kingdom), 31 1: 78-86. doi:10.1177/0267659115586282


Author McDonald, C. I.
Bolle, E.
Lang, H. F.
Ribolzi, C.
Thomson, B.
Tansley, G. D.
Fraser, J. F.
Gregory, S. D.
Title Hydrodynamic evaluation of aortic cardiopulmonary bypass cannulae using particle image velocimetry
Journal name Perfusion (United Kingdom)   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-111X
0267-6591
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0267659115586282
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 78
End page 86
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher SAGE Publications
Language eng
Abstract The high velocity jet from aortic arterial cannulae used during cardiopulmonary bypass potentially causes a “sandblasting” injury to the aorta, increasing the possibility of embolisation of atheromatous plaque. We investigated a range of commonly available dispersion and non-dispersion cannulae, using particle image velocimetry. The maximum velocity of the exit jet was assessed 20 and 40 mm from the cannula tip at flow rates of 3 and 5 L/min. The dispersion cannulae had lower maximum velocities compared to the non-dispersion cannulae. Dispersion cannulae had fan-shaped exit profiles and maximum velocities ranged from 0.63 to 1.52 m/s when measured at 20 mm and 5 L/min. Non-dispersion cannulae had maximum velocities ranging from 1.52 to 3.06 m/s at 20 mm and 5 L/min, with corresponding narrow velocity profiles. This study highlights the importance of understanding the hydrodynamic performance of these cannulae as it may help in selecting the most appropriate cannula to minimize the risk of thromboembolic events or aortic injury.
Keyword Cannula
Cardiopulmonary bypass
Hydrodynamic performance
Dispersion cannula
Particle image velocimetry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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