Reducing operational costs of CO2 sequestration through geothermal energy integration

Li, Melody X., Ricard, Ludovic P., Underschultz, James and Freifeld, Barry M. (2016) Reducing operational costs of CO2 sequestration through geothermal energy integration. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 44 238-248. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.11.012


Author Li, Melody X.
Ricard, Ludovic P.
Underschultz, James
Freifeld, Barry M.
Title Reducing operational costs of CO2 sequestration through geothermal energy integration
Formatted title
Reducing operational costs of CO2 sequestration through geothermal energy integration
Journal name International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1750-5836
1878-0148
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.11.012
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 44
Start page 238
End page 248
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2310 Pollution
2100 Energy
2209 Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
2308 Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
Abstract Commercial scale Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) projects have high capital costs and energy penalties that could be partially offset by including the production of geothermal energy. An important requirement is to match the geothermal resources available at GCS sites with local market opportunities. This paper examines the key parameters that determine viable economics for various hybrid GCS-Geothermal energy applications with a focus on Australian GCS flagship sites as case study examples linked with the initial observations from a pilot trial at the SECARB Cranfield CO demonstration project in Cranfield, Mississippi, USA. At first approximation, offshore GCS-Geothermal coupling seems unlikely due to well costs and the additional engineering requirements. The Perth Basin provides the best opportunity for GCS-Geothermal direct use for desalination. Whilst none of the case study examples would be ideally suited for GCS-Geothermal, insights gained are used to speculate on what conditions would be required for an economically viable opportunity. A strong enabling economic driver is when a GCS project already includes pressure relief water production as part of its base case.
Formatted abstract
Commercial scale Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) projects have high capital costs and energy penalties that could be partially offset by including the production of geothermal energy. An important requirement is to match the geothermal resources available at GCS sites with local market opportunities. This paper examines the key parameters that determine viable economics for various hybrid GCS-Geothermal energy applications with a focus on Australian GCS flagship sites as case study examples linked with the initial observations from a pilot trial at the SECARB Cranfield CO2 demonstration project in Cranfield, Mississippi, USA. At first approximation, offshore GCS-Geothermal coupling seems unlikely due to well costs and the additional engineering requirements. The Perth Basin provides the best opportunity for GCS-Geothermal direct use for desalination. Whilst none of the case study examples would be ideally suited for GCS-Geothermal, insights gained are used to speculate on what conditions would be required for an economically viable opportunity. A strong enabling economic driver is when a GCS project already includes pressure relief water production as part of its base case.
Keyword Australia
Carbon storage
CCS flagship
Electricity
Energy integration
Geothermal direct use
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID
DE-AC0205CH11231
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 9 December 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
Centre for Coal Seam Gas
 
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