Prevalence, correlates, and outcomes of multimorbidity among patients attending primary care in Odisha, India

Pati, Sanghamitra, Swain, Subhashisa, Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar, Kadam, Shridhar and Salisbury, Chris (2015) Prevalence, correlates, and outcomes of multimorbidity among patients attending primary care in Odisha, India. Annals of Family Medicine, 13 5: 446-450. doi:10.1370/afm.1843


Author Pati, Sanghamitra
Swain, Subhashisa
Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar
Kadam, Shridhar
Salisbury, Chris
Title Prevalence, correlates, and outcomes of multimorbidity among patients attending primary care in Odisha, India
Journal name Annals of Family Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1544-1717
1544-1709
Publication date 2015-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1370/afm.1843
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 5
Start page 446
End page 450
Total pages 5
Place of publication Leawood, TX, United States
Publisher Annals of Family Medicine
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Little information is available on multimorbidity in primary care in India. Because primary care is the first contact of health care for most of the population and important for coordinating chronic care, we wanted to examine the prevalence and correlates of multimorbidity in India and its association with health care utilization.

Methods: Using a structured multimorbidity assessment protocol, we conducted a cross-sectional study, collecting information on 22 self-reported chronic conditions in a representative sample of 1,649 adult primary care patients in Odisha, India.

Results: The overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of multimorbidity was 28.3% (95% CI, 24.3–28.6) ranging from 5.8% in patients aged 18 to 29 years to 45% in those aged older than 70 years. Older age, female sex, higher education, and high income were associated with significantly higher odds of multimorbidity. After adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), education, and ethnicity, the addition of each chronic condition, as well as consultation at private hospitals, was associated with significant increase in the number of medicines intake per person per day. Increasing age and higher education status significantly raised the number of hospital visits per person per year for patients with multiple chronic conditions.

Conclusion: Our findings of higher prevalence of multimorbidity and hospitalizations in higher SES individuals contrast with findings in Western countries, where lower SES is associated with a greater morbidity burden.
Keyword Chronic disease
Health care utilization
India
Multimorbidity
Prevalence
Primary health care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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