Occupational loads carried by Australian soldiers on military operations

Orr, Robin Marc, Pope, Rodney, Coyle, Julia and Johnston, Venerina (2015) Occupational loads carried by Australian soldiers on military operations. Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, 31 1: .

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Author Orr, Robin Marc
Pope, Rodney
Coyle, Julia
Johnston, Venerina
Title Occupational loads carried by Australian soldiers on military operations
Journal name Journal of Health, Safety and Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0815-6409
Publication date 2015-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 31
Issue 1
Total pages 13
Place of publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher C C H Australia
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Background: soldiers are required to carry heavy occupational loads on military operations that place their health at risk. Methods: an online survey was sent to soldiers serving in specific Australian Army Corps known to experience high occupational exposure to load carriage. Results: of the 380 respondents, 64% provided operational load carriage data on single or multiple operational deployments, totalling 411 reports. Mean absolute loads carried across the decade 2001-2010, equated to 47.7 kg. Arms corps carried significantly heavier loads than grouped "other corps" and Signals corps. Female soldiers reported carrying significantly (p =.45) lighter absolute loads (M = 26.4 kg) than male soldiers (M = 39.0 kg) with no significant differences found when the loads were expressed relative to body mass (Female M = 43%: Male M = 47%, p =.55). Conclusion: Australian Army soldiers carry absolute loads that are increasing in load mass but may differ between corps and genders due to the tasks performed.
Formatted abstract
Background: soldiers are required to carry heavy occupational loads on military operations that place their health at risk.

Methods: an online survey was sent to soldiers serving in specific Australian Army Corps known to experience high occupational exposure to load carriage.

Results: of the 380 respondents, 64% provided operational load carriage data on single or multiple operational deployments, totalling 411 reports. Mean absolute loads carried across the decade 2001–2010, equated to 47.7 kg. Arms corps carried significantly heavier loads than grouped “other corps” and Signals corps. Female soldiers reported carrying significantly (p = .45) lighter absolute loads (M = 26.4 kg) than male soldiers (M = 39.0 kg) with no significant differences found when the loads were expressed relative to body mass (Female M = 43%: Male M = 47%, p = .55).

Conclusion: Australian Army soldiers carry absolute loads that are increasing in load mass but may differ between corps and genders due to the tasks performed.
Keyword Load carriage
Load marching
Load mass
Military
Operations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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