Stuck in the catch 22: attitudes towards smoking cessation among populations vulnerable to social disadvantage

Pateman, Kelsey, Ford, Pauline, Fitzgerald, Lisa, Mutch, Allyson, Yuke, Kym, Bonevski, Billie and Gartner, Coral (2016) Stuck in the catch 22: attitudes towards smoking cessation among populations vulnerable to social disadvantage. Addiction, 111 6: 1048-1056. doi:10.1111/add.13253

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Author Pateman, Kelsey
Ford, Pauline
Fitzgerald, Lisa
Mutch, Allyson
Yuke, Kym
Bonevski, Billie
Gartner, Coral
Title Stuck in the catch 22: attitudes towards smoking cessation among populations vulnerable to social disadvantage
Journal name Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0965-2140
1360-0443
Publication date 2016-06-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/add.13253
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 111
Issue 6
Start page 1048
End page 1056
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract To explore how smoking and smoking cessation is perceived within the context of disadvantage, across a broad cross-section of defined populations vulnerable to social disadvantage.

Qualitative focus groups with participants recruited through community service organizations (CSO).

Metropolitan and regional settings in Queensland, Australia. Focus groups were held at the respective CSO facilities.

Fifty-six participants across nine focus groups, including people living with mental illness, people experiencing or at risk of homelessness (adult and youth populations), people living with HIV, people living in a low-income area and Indigenous Australians.

Thematic, in-depth analysis of focus group discussions. Participant demographic information and smoking history was recorded.

Smoking behaviour, smoking identity and feelings about smoking were reflective of individual circumstances and social and environmental context. Participants felt 'trapped' in smoking because they felt unable to control the stressful life circumstances that triggered and sustained their smoking. Smoking cessation was viewed as an individual's responsibility, which was at odds with participants' statements about the broader factors outside of their own control that were responsible for their smoking.

Highly disadvantaged smokers' views on smoking involve contradictions between feeling that smoking cessation involves personal responsibility, while at the same time feeling trapped by stressful life circumstances. Tobacco control programmes aiming to reduce smoking among disadvantaged groups are unlikely to be successful unless the complex interplay of social factors is carefully considered.
Formatted abstract
Aim: To explore how smoking and smoking cessation is perceived within the context of disadvantage, across a broad cross section of defined populations vulnerable to social disadvantage.

Design: Qualitative focus groups with participants recruited through community service organisations (CSO).

Setting: Metropolitan and regional settings in Queensland, Australia. Focus groups were held at the respective CSO facilities.

Participants: Fifty-six participants across nine focus groups, including people living with mental illness, people experiencing or at risk of homelessness (adult and youth populations), people living with HIV, people living in a low income area and Indigenous Australians.

Measurements: Thematic, in-depth analysis of focus group discussions. Participant demographic information and smoking history was recorded.

Findings: Smoking behaviour, smoking identity and feelings about smoking were reflective of individual circumstances and social and environmental context. Participants felt ‘trapped’ in smoking because they felt unable to control the stressful life circumstances that triggered and sustained their smoking. Smoking cessation was viewed as an individual's responsibility, which was at odds with participants' statements about the broader factors outside of their own control that were responsible for their smoking.

Conclusion: Highly disadvantaged smokers' views on smoking involve contradictions between feeling that smoking cessation involves personal responsibility while at the same time feeling trapped by stressful life circumstances. Tobacco control programs aiming to reduce smoking among disadvantaged groups are unlikely to be successful unless the complex interplay of social factors is carefully considered.
Keyword Substance Abuse
Psychiatry
Substance Abuse
Psychiatry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID GNT1061978
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 11 Dec 2015, 21:13:07 EST by Coral Gartner on behalf of School of Public Health