Prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency based on maternal mid-gestation and neonatal cord bloods: the Generation R Study

Vinkhuyzen, Anna A.E., Eyles, Darryl W., Burne, Thomas H., Blanken, Laura M.E., Kruithof, Claudia J., Verhulst, Frank, Jaddoe, Vincent W., Tiemeier, Henning and McGrath, John J. (2015) Prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency based on maternal mid-gestation and neonatal cord bloods: the Generation R Study. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry And Molecular Biology, 164 161-167. doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2015.09.018

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Author Vinkhuyzen, Anna A.E.
Eyles, Darryl W.
Burne, Thomas H.
Blanken, Laura M.E.
Kruithof, Claudia J.
Verhulst, Frank
Jaddoe, Vincent W.
Tiemeier, Henning
McGrath, John J.
Title Prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency based on maternal mid-gestation and neonatal cord bloods: the Generation R Study
Journal name Journal of Steroid Biochemistry And Molecular Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0960-0760
1879-1220
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2015.09.018
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 164
Start page 161
End page 167
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Subject 2712 Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
1303 Biochemistry
1313 Molecular Medicine
1312 Molecular Biology
1310 Endocrinology
1308 Clinical Biochemistry
1307 Cell Biology
Abstract Background Population-based studies have confirmed that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is substantial in many societies, and is of particular concern in pregnant women. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is associated with a wide range of adverse maternal and offspring health outcomes. To date, studies of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy have focused on measurements at one or two time points in isolation. We examined both midgestation and cord blood 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration and explored the prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency in a large ethnically diverse cohort of pregnant women and their infants in the Netherlands. Methods This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort from fetal life onwards in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Using a highly sensitive tandem mass spectroscopy-based assay, we measured 25OHD in 7256 midgestation samples (mean gestation 20.6 weeks) and 5023 neonatal cord blood samples (mean gestation 40.0 weeks). Using a conservative threshold of less than 25 nmol/L to define vitamin D deficiency, we examined the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of vitamin D deficiency in mothers and infants. We also derived a measure of vitamin D deficiency based on the two time points in order to explore persistent vitamin D deficiency in mother-infant pairs. Results The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency at midgestation was 26%, while in neonates 46% were deficient. 21% of the mother-infant pairs had persistent vitamin D deficiency (i.e., deficient in maternal and cord samples) and an additional 29% were vitamin D deficient in one of the two samples only. Persistent vitamin D deficiency was strongly associated with non-European ancestry and spring birth. Conclusions A sizeable proportion of women and their neonatal offspring in the Generation R cohort were vitamin D deficient. In light of the large body of evidence linking vitamin D deficiency with adverse health outcomes for pregnant women and their offspring, our findings indicate a large unmet need in this population. In particular, women and infants from non-European ethnic background are at high risk of vitamin D deficiency.
Formatted abstract
Background

Population-based studies have confirmed that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is substantial in many societies, and is of particular concern in pregnant women. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is associated with a wide range of adverse maternal and offspring health outcomes. To date, studies of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy have focused on measurements at one or two time points in isolation. We examined both midgestation and cord blood 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration and explored the prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency in a large ethnically diverse cohort of pregnant women and their infants in the Netherlands.

Methods


This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort from fetal life onwards in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Using a highly sensitive tandem mass spectroscopy-based assay, we measured 25OHD in 7256 midgestation samples (mean gestation 20.6 weeks) and 5023 neonatal cord blood samples (mean gestation 40.0 weeks). Using a conservative threshold of less than 25 nmol/L to define vitamin D deficiency, we examined the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of vitamin D deficiency in mothers and infants. We also derived a measure of vitamin D deficiency based on the two time points in order to explore persistent vitamin D deficiency in mother-infant pairs.

Results

The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency at midgestation was 26%, while in neonates 46% were deficient. 21% of the mother-infant pairs had persistent vitamin D deficiency (i.e., deficient in maternal and cord samples) and an additional 29% were vitamin D deficient in one of the two samples only. Persistent vitamin D deficiency was strongly associated with non-European ancestry and spring birth.

Conclusions

A sizeable proportion of women and their neonatal offspring in the Generation R cohort were vitamin D deficient. In light of the large body of evidence linking vitamin D deficiency with adverse health outcomes for pregnant women and their offspring, our findings indicate a large unmet need in this population. In particular, women and infants from non-European ethnic background are at high risk of vitamin D deficiency.
Keyword 25 Hydroxyvitamin D
Victamin D
Prenatal
Cord blood
Epidemiology
Risk factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1062846
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Dec 2015, 02:07:36 EST by Susan Day on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute