The initial effects of a sustained glenohumeral postero-lateral glide during elevation on shoulder muscle activity: A repeated measures study on asymptomatic shoulders

Ribeiro, Daniel Cury, Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi, Sole, Gisela and Vicenzino, Bill (2016) The initial effects of a sustained glenohumeral postero-lateral glide during elevation on shoulder muscle activity: A repeated measures study on asymptomatic shoulders. Manual Therapy, 22 101-108. doi:10.1016/j.math.2015.10.014

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Author Ribeiro, Daniel Cury
Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi
Sole, Gisela
Vicenzino, Bill
Title The initial effects of a sustained glenohumeral postero-lateral glide during elevation on shoulder muscle activity: A repeated measures study on asymptomatic shoulders
Journal name Manual Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1532-2769
1356-689X
Publication date 2016-04-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2015.10.014
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 22
Start page 101
End page 108
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Language eng
Subject 3612 Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Abstract Background: Manual therapy enhances pain-free range of motion and reduces pain levels, but its effect on shoulder muscle activity is unclear. This study aimed to assess the effects of a sustained glenohumeral postero-lateral glide during elevation on shoulder muscle activity. Methods: Thirty asymptomatic individuals participated in a repeated measures study of the electromyographic activity of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, posterior deltoid, and middle deltoid. Participants performed four sets of 10 repetitions of shoulder scaption and abduction with and without a glide of the glenohumeral joint. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to assess the effects of movement direction (scaption and abduction), and condition (with and without glide) (within-subject factors) on activity level of each muscle (dependent variables). Significant MANOVAs were followed-up with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance. Results: During shoulder scaption with glide, the supraspinatus showed a reduction of 4.1% maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVIC) (95% CI 2.4, 5.8); and infraspinatus 1.3% MVIC (95% CI 0.5, 2.1). During shoulder abduction with a glide, supraspinatus presented a reduction of 2.5% MVIC (95% CI 1.1, 4.0), infraspinatus 2.1% MVIC (95% CI 1.0, 3.2), middle deltoid 2.2% MVIC (95% CI = 0.4, 4.1), posterior deltoid 2.1% MVIC (95% CI 1.3, 2.8). Conclusions: In asymptomatic individuals, sustained glide reduced shoulder muscle activity compared to control conditions. This might be useful in enhancing shoulder movement in clinical populations. Reductions in muscle activity might result from altered joint mechanics, including simply helping to lift the arm, and/or through changing afferent sensory input about the shoulder.
Formatted abstract
Background

Manual therapy enhances pain-free range of motion and reduces pain levels, but its effect on shoulder muscle activity is unclear. This study aimed to assess the effects of a sustained glenohumeral postero-lateral glide during elevation on shoulder muscle activity.

Methods


Thirty asymptomatic individuals participated in a repeated measures study of the electromyographic activity of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, posterior deltoid, and middle deltoid. Participants performed four sets of 10 repetitions of shoulder scaption and abduction with and without a glide of the glenohumeral joint. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to assess the effects of movement direction (scaption and abduction), and condition (with and without glide) (within-subject factors) on activity level of each muscle (dependent variables). Significant MANOVAs were followed-up with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance.

Results

During shoulder scaption with glide, the supraspinatus showed a reduction of 4.1% maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVIC) (95% CI 2.4, 5.8); and infraspinatus 1.3% MVIC (95% CI 0.5, 2.1). During shoulder abduction with a glide, supraspinatus presented a reduction of 2.5% MVIC (95% CI 1.1, 4.0), infraspinatus 2.1% MVIC (95% CI 1.0, 3.2), middle deltoid 2.2% MVIC (95% CI = 0.4, 4.1), posterior deltoid 2.1% MVIC (95% CI 1.3, 2.8).

Conclusions

In asymptomatic individuals, sustained glide reduced shoulder muscle activity compared to control conditions. This might be useful in enhancing shoulder movement in clinical populations. Reductions in muscle activity might result from altered joint mechanics, including simply helping to lift the arm, and/or through changing afferent sensory input about the shoulder.
Keyword Shoulder
Manual therapies
Electromyography
Musculoskeletal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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