How Patients Perceive Their Doctors’ Communication: Implications for Patient Willingness to Communicate

Baker, Susan C. and Watson, Bernadette M. (2015) How Patients Perceive Their Doctors’ Communication: Implications for Patient Willingness to Communicate. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 34 6: 621-639. doi:10.1177/0261927X15587015


Author Baker, Susan C.
Watson, Bernadette M.
Title How Patients Perceive Their Doctors’ Communication: Implications for Patient Willingness to Communicate
Journal name Journal of Language and Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1552-6526
0261-927X
Publication date 2015-12-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0261927X15587015
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 621
End page 639
Total pages 19
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Formatted abstract
By emphasizing the value of health professionals’ communication skills in creating positive health care experiences, researchers have tended to study health communication as an interpersonal encounter. Interactions in the health context, though, are inherently intergroup. Using the language and social psychology approach, this study emphasizes those intergroup features of health communication. We used mixed methods and applied communication accommodation theory and the willingness to communicate construct to the health context. Participants in Canada and Australia (N = 371) were asked about their perceptions of their health consultations. Multiple regression analyses revealed that health communication competence was the best predictor of patient willingness to communicate. Differences between patients’ accounts of positive and negative health care experiences were clearly differentiated by their perceptions of the health professionals’ communication strategies. The potential effects of these strategies on patient participation are discussed.
Keyword Intergroup communication
Willingness to communicate
Communication accommodation strategies
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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