Evidence of tactile dominance when integrated with proprioception–application to haptic feedback interfaces

Gildersleeve, Matthew (2012) Evidence of tactile dominance when integrated with proprioception–application to haptic feedback interfaces. Procedia Engineering, 41 1035-1043. doi:10.1016/j.proeng.2012.07.280


Author Gildersleeve, Matthew
Title Evidence of tactile dominance when integrated with proprioception–application to haptic feedback interfaces
Journal name Procedia Engineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1877-7058
Publication date 2012-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.proeng.2012.07.280
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 41
Start page 1035
End page 1043
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract This paper aims to emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach that may be able to account for tthe results in haptic feedback studies and to describe a framework for future research to achieve optimal surgical performance in haptiic feedback robotic surgery. Specifically, the value of integrating and unders standing the sensorimotor weighting mechanisms underlyin ng laparoscopic performance will be highlighted to develop future design, traiining and use of haptic feedback robotic surgery devices. TThe results presented in this study show that the sagittal distance estimate betw ween touched positions on the upper limb can be systematiccally biased by manipulating the touched position on the arm, although the s sagittal separation remains unaltered (12.7 cm). These resu ults are somewhat surprising regarding the participants apparent neglect of pro oprioceptive input which would indicate limb position follo owing changes in elbow and shoulder joint angles and muscle length. If the pa articipant was optimizing the use of their proprioceptive inp put it would be expected that movement of the limb would translate into a com mputation to maintain the status quo of the perceived separattion of the probe and button. These results suggest that reporting tactile separa ation may be more difficult across limbs compared to withiin one limb and that sensory cues about tactile position (touched body segme ent and the distance from anatomical landmarks) outweig gh joint angle/muscle length positional information.
Keyword Multisensory Integration
Human Factors
Proprioception
Haptic
Robotic Surgery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Nov 2015, 20:54:50 EST by Mr Matt Gildersleeve on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences