Evaluation of methods for calculating maximum allowable standing height in amputees competing in Paralympic athletics

Connick, M. J., Beckman, E., Ibusuki, T., Malone, L. and Tweedy, S. M. (2015) Evaluation of methods for calculating maximum allowable standing height in amputees competing in Paralympic athletics. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26 11: 1353-1359. doi:10.1111/sms.12586


Author Connick, M. J.
Beckman, E.
Ibusuki, T.
Malone, L.
Tweedy, S. M.
Title Evaluation of methods for calculating maximum allowable standing height in amputees competing in Paralympic athletics
Journal name Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0905-7188
1600-0838
Publication date 2015-11-21
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/sms.12586
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 26
Issue 11
Start page 1353
End page 1359
Total pages 7
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2732 Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
3612 Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Abstract The International Paralympic Committee has a maximum allowable standing height (MASH) rule that limits stature to a pre-trauma estimation. The MASH rule reduces the probability that bilateral lower limb amputees use disproportionately long prostheses in competition. Although there are several methods for estimating stature, the validity of these methods has not been compared. To identify the most appropriate method for the MASH rule, this study aimed to compare the criterion validity of estimations resulting from the current method, the Contini method, and four Canda methods (Canda-1, Canda-2, Canda-3, and Canda-4). Stature, ulna length, demispan, sitting height, thigh length, upper arm length, and forearm length measurements in 31 males and 30 females were used to calculate the respective estimation for each method. Results showed that Canda-1 (based on four anthropometric variables) produced the smallest error and best fitted the data in males and females. The current method was associated with the largest error of those tests because it increasingly overestimated height in people with smaller stature. The results suggest that the set of Canda equations provide a more valid MASH estimation in people with a range of upper limb and bilateral lower limb amputations compared with the current method.
Formatted abstract
The International Paralympic Committee has a maximum allowable standing height (MASH) rule that limits stature to a pre-trauma estimation. The MASH rule reduces the probability that bilateral lower limb amputees use disproportionately long prostheses in competition. Although there are several methods for estimating stature, the validity of these methods has not been compared. To identify the most appropriate method for the MASH rule, this study aimed to compare the criterion validity of estimations resulting from the current method, the Contini method, and four Canda methods (Canda-1, Canda-2, Canda-3, and Canda-4). Stature, ulna length, demispan, sitting height, thigh length, upper arm length, and forearm length measurements in 31 males and 30 females were used to calculate the respective estimation for each method. Results showed that Canda-1 (based on four anthropometric variables) produced the smallest error and best fitted the data in males and females. The current method was associated with the largest error of those tests because it increasingly overestimated height in people with smaller stature. The results suggest that the set of Canda equations provide a more valid MASH estimation in people with a range of upper limb and bilateral lower limb amputations compared with the current method.
Keyword Running - specific prosthetics
Leg Length
Blades
Sprinting
Disability sport
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Nov 2015, 20:03:26 EST by Dr Mark Connick on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences