Behavioural adaptation to climate change among winter alpine tourists: an analysis of tourist motivations and leisure substitutability

Cocolas, Nicole, Walters, Gabrielle and Ruhanen, Lisa (2015) Behavioural adaptation to climate change among winter alpine tourists: an analysis of tourist motivations and leisure substitutability. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 24 6: 846-865. doi:10.1080/09669582.2015.1088860


Author Cocolas, Nicole
Walters, Gabrielle
Ruhanen, Lisa
Title Behavioural adaptation to climate change among winter alpine tourists: an analysis of tourist motivations and leisure substitutability
Journal name Journal of Sustainable Tourism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0966-9582
1747-7646
Publication date 2015-11-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09669582.2015.1088860
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 24
Issue 6
Start page 846
End page 865
Total pages 20
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 3305 Geography, Planning and Development
1409 Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
Abstract Understanding market responses to climate change impacts has important implications for the sustainability of Australia's winter tourism destinations. Utilising a framework incorporating push–pull tourist motivations and the theory of leisure substitutability, this study sought to explore how winter tourists in Australia will adapt to changes in snow cover in Australia's alpine regions under future climate change scenarios. The results of a questionnaire completed by 231 respondents indicated that tourist motivations were related to behavioural adaptation, and that there is a general preference among the current winter market for spatial substitution in the event of poor snow. Those motivated by recreation specialisation or snow-related attributes were likely to opt for spatial substitution, while tourists motivated by self-expression and après ski activities displayed resilience to poor snow conditions. The results demonstrate a clear division between leisure-driven tourists who valued participation in sport, and experience-driven tourists, who displayed higher resilience to reduced snow under projected climate change scenarios. These results have practical implications for winter tourism destinations, both in terms of targeting experience-driven tourists in the case of reduced snow as well as the longer term sustainability and viability of winter tourism destinations.
Formatted abstract
Understanding market responses to climate change impacts has important implications for the sustainability of Australia's winter tourism destinations. Utilising a framework incorporating push–pull tourist motivations and the theory of leisure substitutability, this study sought to explore how winter tourists in Australia will adapt to changes in snow cover in Australia's alpine regions under future climate change scenarios. The results of a questionnaire completed by 231 respondents indicated that tourist motivations were related to behavioural adaptation, and that there is a general preference among the current winter market for spatial substitution in the event of poor snow. Those motivated by recreation specialisation or snow-related attributes were likely to opt for spatial substitution, while tourists motivated by self-expression and après ski activities displayed resilience to poor snow conditions. The results demonstrate a clear division between leisure-driven tourists who valued participation in sport, and experience-driven tourists, who displayed higher resilience to reduced snow under projected climate change scenarios. These results have practical implications for winter tourism destinations, both in terms of targeting experience-driven tourists in the case of reduced snow as well as the longer term sustainability and viability of winter tourism destinations.
Keyword Alpine tourism
Behavioural adaptation
Climate change
Leisure substitutability
Tourist motivations
Winter Tourism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 24 Nov 2015, 10:30:20 EST by System User on behalf of UQ Business School