Age differences in brain systems supporting transient and sustained processes involved in prospective memory and working memory

Peira, Nathalie, Ziaei, Maryam and Persson, Jonas (2016) Age differences in brain systems supporting transient and sustained processes involved in prospective memory and working memory. NeuroImage, 125 745-755. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.10.075


Author Peira, Nathalie
Ziaei, Maryam
Persson, Jonas
Title Age differences in brain systems supporting transient and sustained processes involved in prospective memory and working memory
Journal name NeuroImage   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1053-8119
1095-9572
Publication date 2016-01-15
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.10.075
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 125
Start page 745
End page 755
Total pages 11
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In prospective memory (PM), an intention to act in response to an external event is formed, retained, and at a later stage, when the event occurs, the relevant action is performed. PM typically shows a decline in late adulthood, which might affect functions of daily living. The neural correlates of this decline are not well understood. Here, 15 young (6 female; age range = 23–30 years) and 16 older adults (5 female; age range = 64–74 years) were scanned with fMRI to examine age-related differences in brain activation associated with event-based PM using a task that facilitated the separation of transient and sustained components of PM. We show that older adults had reduced performance in conditions with high demands on prospective and working memory, while no age-difference was observed in low-demanding tasks. Across age groups, PM task performance activated separate sets of brain regions for transient and sustained responses. Age-differences in transient activation were found in fronto-striatal and MTL regions, with young adults showing more activation than older adults. Increased activation in young, compared to older adults, was also found for sustained PM activation in the IFG. These results provide new evidence that PM relies on dissociable transient and sustained cognitive processes, and that age-related deficits in PM can be explained by an inability to recruit PM-related brain networks in old age.
Keyword Aging
fMRI
Prospective memory
Working memory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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