Mental health and service use: men who served in the Australian military, women who received Department of Veterans' Affairs benefits, and the general population.

McGuire, Annabel, Dobson, Annette, Mewton, Louise, Varker, Tracey, Forbes, David and Wade, Darryl (2015) Mental health and service use: men who served in the Australian military, women who received Department of Veterans' Affairs benefits, and the general population.. ANZ Journal of Public Health, 39 6: 524-529. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12431


Author McGuire, Annabel
Dobson, Annette
Mewton, Louise
Varker, Tracey
Forbes, David
Wade, Darryl
Title Mental health and service use: men who served in the Australian military, women who received Department of Veterans' Affairs benefits, and the general population.
Journal name ANZ Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1753-6405
1326-0200
Publication date 2015-09-03
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12431
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 39
Issue 6
Start page 524
End page 529
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, Victoria, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To compare the lifetime prevalence of affective, anxiety and substance use disorders and the use of mental health services between people who had served in the Australian Defence Force (ADF) or received Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) benefits and the general population.

Method: The 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing obtained data from a nationally representative household survey of 8,841 respondents.

Results: Fewer than 20% of men who had served in the ADF reported receiving benefits from DVA. ADF men were older and more likely to report poorer health than other men. They were 50% more likely to be diagnosed with any lifetime mental disorder, any affective disorder, depression, PTSD, any substance use and alcohol disorder. Almost 90% of women who received DVA benefits had not served in the ADF. DVA women were older, and more likely to report moderate/severe psychological distress and less life satisfaction than other women. There was no evidence of greater lifetime use of mental health services by ADF men or DVA women compared to the general population.

Conclusions: Health care providers should ask their patients if they have connections with the military in order to better detect and treat potential mental health problems.
Keyword Military service
Mental health
Service use
Veterans' support
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 18 Nov 2015, 23:43:51 EST by Alison Manley on behalf of School of Public Health