The effect of multiple deployments on military families: a cross sectional study of health and well-being of partners and children

McGuire, Annabel C. L., Kanesarajah, Jeeva, Runge, Catherine E., Ireland, Renee, Waller, Michael and Dobson, Annette J. (2016) The effect of multiple deployments on military families: a cross sectional study of health and well-being of partners and children. Military Medicine, 181 4: 319-327. doi:10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00310


Author McGuire, Annabel C. L.
Kanesarajah, Jeeva
Runge, Catherine E.
Ireland, Renee
Waller, Michael
Dobson, Annette J.
Title The effect of multiple deployments on military families: a cross sectional study of health and well-being of partners and children
Journal name Military Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0026-4075
1930-613X
Publication date 2016-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00310
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 181
Issue 4
Start page 319
End page 327
Total pages 8
Place of publication Bethesda, United States
Publisher Association of Military Surgeons of the U S
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study explored the impact of multiple deployments on the health and well-being of the partners (married or de facto) and children of Australian military personnel who have deployed frequently. Permission to contact military partners was sought from a sample of Australian Defence Force (ADF) members. Partners provided data on deployment history, physical health, mental health, and their children's emotions, and behaviors. Associations between multiple deployments and health and well-being of partners and children were assessed using logistic regression. Data were collected from 1,332 Australian Defence Force partners (response rate 36%) with 1,095 children aged between 4 and 17 years. Almost half (47%) of partners had experienced more than one deployment, mainly to Timor-Leste, Iraq, and Afghanistan. There was little evidence of associations between numbers of deployments and the health of the partner. In contrast, more behavioral problems were reported for children who experienced two or more deployments with odds ratios generally greater than 2 and significant trends with increasing numbers of deployment. Although military families who experience multiple deployments may, by selection, be more resilient than those who have fewer deployments, these results suggest that adverse impacts on the children may accrue with increasing parental absences because of deployment.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
Centre for Military and Veterans' Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 18 Nov 2015, 23:37:58 EST by Alison Manley on behalf of School of Public Health