Aiming for excellence: Reflections on the Advanced Institute of Management Research and its elite

MacDonald, Stuart, Steen, John and Shazi, Rahmat (2015) Aiming for excellence: Reflections on the Advanced Institute of Management Research and its elite. British Journal of Management, 27 2: 438-454. doi:10.1111/1467-8551.12147


Author MacDonald, Stuart
Steen, John
Shazi, Rahmat
Title Aiming for excellence: Reflections on the Advanced Institute of Management Research and its elite
Journal name British Journal of Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1045-3172
1467-8551
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1467-8551.12147
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 27
Issue 2
Start page 438
End page 454
Total pages 17
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In 2002, the UK government launched the Advanced Institute of Management Research, a major initiative intended to raise the quality of research in business schools. Rather than offering research grants in open competition, AIM deliberately funded a select few leading lights in management. Insufficient allowance was made for the Research Assessment Exercise, which measured research excellence in terms of papers published in top journals. The AIM's elite exploited its existing publishing advantage, and AIM provided further resources to aid their efforts. The AIM recruited willing acolytes to work with its elite in fashioning the sort of papers required by the top journals of management – positive papers, consensual and endlessly citable. Analysis of the publishing patterns of AIM senior fellows reveals research cliques and publication silos rather than a network organization. Much as the elite saw its AIM funding as recognition of its own excellence, so AIM itself came to be seen as acknowledgement of the excellence of management research as a whole. That AIM existed to raise management research from intellectual poverty was forgotten. The AIM was wound up in 2012, having spent £30 million, most of it on the subject's elite. The problems that beset management research remain.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 13 Nov 2015, 20:24:20 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School