Maternal perceptions of breastfeeding difficulty after caesarean section with regional anaesthesia: A qualitative study

Chaplin, Jacqueline, Kelly, Jennifer and Kildea, Sue (2015) Maternal perceptions of breastfeeding difficulty after caesarean section with regional anaesthesia: A qualitative study. Women and Birth, 29 2: 144-152. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2015.09.005


Author Chaplin, Jacqueline
Kelly, Jennifer
Kildea, Sue
Title Maternal perceptions of breastfeeding difficulty after caesarean section with regional anaesthesia: A qualitative study
Journal name Women and Birth   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1871-5192
1878-1799
Publication date 2015-09-27
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2015.09.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 2
Start page 144
End page 152
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

Caesarean delivery rates have increased in Australia over the last decade creating new challenges for breastfeeding mothers and caregivers. The advantages of breastfeeding are well recognised, however breastfeeding problems are common. Review of the literature revealed limited qualitative research relating to the experience of women having difficulties breastfeeding after caesarean section under regional anaesthesia. This study aimed to fill that gap in the literature.

Methods

Participants were women referred to the hospital Breastfeeding Support Centre with difficulty initiating and establishing breastfeeding. The methodology employed was interpretive phenomenology and purposeful sampling. Data was analysed using van Manen's hermeneutical circular process.

Results

Themes identified included Unnatural birth, Natural instincts compromised, Helping mothers to mother and Sabotage and defeat. These themes elicited ten subthemes which were interpreted and reflected upon to reveal key findings. These findings included the emotional and physical effects of the delivery and anaesthetic, the lack of true skin to skin contact, separation of mother and baby, inconsistent information, inadequate support, unnecessary formula supplementation and feelings of failure.

Conclusion

Key recommendations included increasing skin to skin contact after caesarean section to support the natural instincts of mother and baby, increasing education on possible effects of surgical delivery on breastfeeding and increasing postnatal breastfeeding support for this group of women. Broader issues of inadequate staffing and a changing postnatal dynamic reflecting increased post-surgical care need further exploration.
Keyword Breastfeeding difficulties
Caesarean section
Regional anaesthesia
Breastfeeding support
Interpretive phenomenology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article online ahead of print. Link to Journal Article: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871519215003182

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 02 Nov 2015, 18:42:59 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work