The epigenetic clock is correlated with physical and cognitive fitness in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

Marioni, Riccardo E., Shah, Sonia, McRae, Allan F., Ritchie, Stuart J., Muniz-Terrera, Graciela, Harris, Sarah E., Gibson, Jude, Redmond, Paul, Cox, Simon R., Pattie, Alison, Corley, Janie, Taylor, Adele, Murphy, Lee, Starr, John M., Horvath, Steve, Visscher, Peter M., Wray, Naomi R. and Deary, Ian J. (2015) The epigenetic clock is correlated with physical and cognitive fitness in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. International Journal of Epidemiology, 44 4: 1388-1396. doi:10.1093/ije/dyu277


Author Marioni, Riccardo E.
Shah, Sonia
McRae, Allan F.
Ritchie, Stuart J.
Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
Harris, Sarah E.
Gibson, Jude
Redmond, Paul
Cox, Simon R.
Pattie, Alison
Corley, Janie
Taylor, Adele
Murphy, Lee
Starr, John M.
Horvath, Steve
Visscher, Peter M.
Wray, Naomi R.
Deary, Ian J.
Title The epigenetic clock is correlated with physical and cognitive fitness in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936
Journal name International Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-3685
0300-5771
Publication date 2015-08-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyu277
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 4
Start page 1388
End page 1396
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject 2713 Epidemiology
Abstract Background: The DNA methylation-based 'epigenetic clock' correlates strongly with chronological age, but it is currently unclear what drives individual differences. We examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the epigenetic clock and four mortality-linked markers of physical and mental fitness: lung function, walking speed, grip strength and cognitive ability. Methods: DNA methylation-based age acceleration (residuals of the epigenetic clock estimate regressed on chronological age) were estimated in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 at ages 70 (n=920), 73 (n=299) and 76 (n=273) years. General cognitive ability, walking speed, lung function and grip strength were measured concurrently. Cross-sectional correlations between age acceleration and the fitness variables were calculated. Longitudinal change in the epigenetic clock estimates and the fitness variables were assessed via linear mixed models and latent growth curves. Epigenetic age acceleration at age 70 was used as a predictor of longitudinal change in fitness. Epigenome-wide association studies (EWASs) were conducted on the four fitness measures. Results: Cross-sectional correlations were significant between greater age acceleration and poorer performance on the lung function, cognition and grip strength measures (r range: -0.07 to -0.05, P range: 9.7 x 10 to 0.024). All of the fitness variables declined over time but age acceleration did not correlate with subsequent change over 6 years. There were no EWAS hits for the fitness traits. Conclusions: Markers of physical and mental fitness are associated with the epigenetic clock (lower abilities associated with age acceleration). However, age acceleration does not associate with decline in these measures, at least over a relatively short follow-up.
Formatted abstract
Background: The DNA methylation-based ‘epigenetic clock’ correlates strongly with chronological age, but it is currently unclear what drives individual differences. We examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the epigenetic clock and four mortality-linked markers of physical and mental fitness: lung function, walking speed, grip strength and cognitive ability.

Methods:
DNA methylation-based age acceleration (residuals of the epigenetic clock estimate regressed on chronological age) were estimated in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 at ages 70 (n = 920), 73 (n = 299) and 76 (n = 273) years. General cognitive ability, walking speed, lung function and grip strength were measured concurrently. Cross-sectional correlations between age acceleration and the fitness variables were calculated. Longitudinal change in the epigenetic clock estimates and the fitness variables were assessed via linear mixed models and latent growth curves. Epigenetic age acceleration at age 70 was used as a predictor of longitudinal change in fitness. Epigenome-wide association studies (EWASs) were conducted on the four fitness measures.

Results: Cross-sectional correlations were significant between greater age acceleration and poorer performance on the lung function, cognition and grip strength measures (r range: −0.07 to −0.05, P range: 9.7 x 10−3 to 0.024). All of the fitness variables declined over time but age acceleration did not correlate with subsequent change over 6 years. There were no EWAS hits for the fitness traits.

Conclusions: Markers of physical and mental fitness are associated with the epigenetic clock (lower abilities associated with age acceleration). However, age acceleration does not associate with decline in these measures, at least over a relatively short follow-up.
Keyword Epigenetic clock
Fitness
Longitudinal
DNA methylation
Cognitive function
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID MR/K026992/1
613608
613602
FT0991360
1P01AG043362
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2016 Collection
UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 86 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 95 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 27 Oct 2015, 02:37:12 EST by Susan Day on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service