The moderating role of social support in Karasek's job strain model

Sargent, L. D. and Terry, D. J. (2000) The moderating role of social support in Karasek's job strain model. Work And Stress, 14 3: 245-261. doi:10.1080/02678370010025568


Author Sargent, L. D.
Terry, D. J.
Title The moderating role of social support in Karasek's job strain model
Journal name Work And Stress   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0267-8373
Publication date 2000-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02678370010025568
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 14
Issue 3
Start page 245
End page 261
Total pages 17
Editor T.Cox
Place of publication U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 380108 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
C1
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
Abstract This paper examines whether social support is a boundary-determining criterion in the job strain model of Karasek (1979). The particular focus is the extent to which different sources of social support, work overload and task control influence job satisfaction, depersonalization and supervisor assessments of work performance. Hypotheses are tested using prospective survey data from 80 clerical staff in a university setting. Results revealed 3-way interactions among levels of support (supervisor, co-worker, non-work), perceived task control and work overload on levels of work performance and employee adjustment (self-report). After controlling for levels of negative affect in all analyses, there was evidence that high levels of supervisor support mitigated against the negative effects of high strain jobs on levels of job satisfaction and reduced reported levels of depersonalization. Moreover, high levels of non-work support and co-worker support also mitigated against the negative effects of high strain jobs on levels of work performance. The results are discussed in terms of the importance of social support networks both at, and beyond, the work context.
Keyword Psychology, Applied
Karasek's Job Strain Model
Social Support
Job Satisfaction
Work Performance
Depersonalization
Negative Affectivity
Production Responsibility
Cognitive Demand
Stress
Work
Burnout
Satisfaction
Health
Performance
Distress
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 92 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 22:15:20 EST