Comparison of audio and audiovisual measures of adult stuttering: Implications for clinical trials

O'brian, Sue, Jones, Mark, Onslow, Mark, Packman, Ann, Menzies, Ross and Lowe, Robyn (2015) Comparison of audio and audiovisual measures of adult stuttering: Implications for clinical trials. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 17 6: 589-593. doi:10.3109/17549507.2015.1026275


Author O'brian, Sue
Jones, Mark
Onslow, Mark
Packman, Ann
Menzies, Ross
Lowe, Robyn
Title Comparison of audio and audiovisual measures of adult stuttering: Implications for clinical trials
Journal name International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Publication date 2015-11-02
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2015.1026275
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 17
Issue 6
Start page 589
End page 593
Total pages 5
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 2733 Otorhinolaryngology
2912 LPN and LVN
3616 Speech and Hearing
2922 Research and Theory
1203 Language and Linguistics
Abstract Purpose: This study investigated whether measures of percentage syllables stuttered (%SS) and stuttering severity ratings with a 9-point scale differ when made from audiovisual compared with audio-only recordings.Method: Four experienced speech-language pathologists measured %SS and assigned stuttering severity ratings to 10-minute audiovisual and audio-only recordings of 36 adults.Result: There was a mean 18% increase in %SS scores when samples were presented in audiovisual compared with audio-only mode. This result was consistent across both higher and lower %SS scores and was found to be directly attributable to counts of stuttered syllables rather than the total number of syllables. There was no significant difference between stuttering severity ratings made from the two modes.Conclusion: In clinical trials research, when using %SS as the primary outcome measure, audiovisual samples would be preferred as long as clear, good quality, front-on images can be easily captured. Alternatively, stuttering severity ratings may be a more valid measure to use as they correlate well with %SS and values are not influenced by the presentation mode.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: This study investigated whether measures of percentage syllables stuttered (%SS) and stuttering severity ratings with a 9-point scale differ when made from audiovisual compared with audio-only recordings.

Method: Four experienced speech-language pathologists measured %SS and assigned stuttering severity ratings to 10-minute audiovisual and audio-only recordings of 36 adults.

Result: There was a mean 18% increase in %SS scores when samples were presented in audiovisual compared with audio-only mode. This result was consistent across both higher and lower %SS scores and was found to be directly attributable to counts of stuttered syllables rather than the total number of syllables. There was no significant difference between stuttering severity ratings made from the two modes.

Conclusion: In clinical trials research, when using %SS as the primary outcome measure, audiovisual samples would be preferred as long as clear, good quality, front-on images can be easily captured. Alternatively, stuttering severity ratings may be a more valid measure to use as they correlate well with %SS and values are not influenced by the presentation mode.
Keyword Stuttering measurement
Percentage syllables stuttered
Severity rating
Audiovisual
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 13 Oct 2015, 13:51:01 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service