Effects of frequent PATient moves on patient outcomes in a large tertiary Hospital (the PATH study): a prospective cohort study

Webster, Joan, New, Karen, Fenn, Mary, Batch, Mary, Eastgate, Alyson, Webber, Selena and Nesbit, Anthony (2015) Effects of frequent PATient moves on patient outcomes in a large tertiary Hospital (the PATH study): a prospective cohort study. Australian Health Review, 40 3: 324-329. doi:10.1071/AH15095


Author Webster, Joan
New, Karen
Fenn, Mary
Batch, Mary
Eastgate, Alyson
Webber, Selena
Nesbit, Anthony
Title Effects of frequent PATient moves on patient outcomes in a large tertiary Hospital (the PATH study): a prospective cohort study
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2015-09-21
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH15095
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 40
Issue 3
Start page 324
End page 329
Total pages 6
Place of publication Clayton, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of and patient outcomes associated with frequent patient moves.

Methods: In a prospective cohort study, any bed move and the reason for the move were documented. Patients were assessed on admission for anxiety, social support and delirium. Adverse events, length of stay and satisfaction were recorded. Patients moved three or more times were compared with those moved less than three times.

Results: In all, 566 patients admitted to a tertiary referral hospital were included in the study. Of these, 156 patients (27.6%) were moved once, 46 (8.1%) were moved twice and 28 (4.9%) were moved at least three times. Those moved three or more times were almost threefold more likely to have an adverse event recorded compared with those moved fewer times (relative risk (RR) 2.75; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 6.42; P = 0.02) and to have a hospital stay twice as long (RR 7.10; 95% CI 2.60, 11.60; P = 0.002). Levels of satisfaction and anxiety were not affected by frequent moves and there was no effect on delirium.

Conclusion: Frequent bed moves affect patient safety and prolong length of stay.
Keyword Healthcare costs
Patient safety
Patient transfer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=AH15095

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 08 Oct 2015, 20:42:48 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work