Child and adolescent exposure to alcohol advertising in Australia's major televised sports

Carr, Sherilene, O'Brien, Kerry S., Ferris, Jason, Room, Robin, Livingston, Michael, Vandenberg, Brian, Donovan, Robert J. and Lynott, Dermot (2016) Child and adolescent exposure to alcohol advertising in Australia's major televised sports. Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 4: 406-411. doi:10.1111/dar.12326


Author Carr, Sherilene
O'Brien, Kerry S.
Ferris, Jason
Room, Robin
Livingston, Michael
Vandenberg, Brian
Donovan, Robert J.
Lynott, Dermot
Title Child and adolescent exposure to alcohol advertising in Australia's major televised sports
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1465-3362
0959-5236
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12326
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 35
Issue 4
Start page 406
End page 411
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 3306 Health (social science)
2701 Medicine (miscellaneous)
Abstract Introduction and Aims: Exposure to alcohol advertising is associated with greater alcohol consumption in children and adolescents, and alcohol advertising is common in Australian sport. We examine child, adolescent and young adult exposure to alcohol advertising during three televised sports in Australia: Australian Football League (AFL), cricket and the National Rugby League (NRL). Methods: Alcohol advertising and audience viewing data were purchased for all AFL, cricket and NRL TV programs in Australia for 2012. We estimated children and adolescents (0–17 years) and young adults (18–29 years) exposure to alcohol advertising during AFL, cricket and NRL programs in the daytime (06:00–20:29 h), and night-time (20:30–23:59 h). Results: There were 3544 alcohol advertisements in AFL (1942), cricket (941) and NRL programs (661), representing 60% of all alcohol advertising in sport TV, and 15% of all alcohol advertisements on Australian TV. These programs had a cumulative audience of 26.9 million children and adolescents, and 32 million young adults. Children and adolescents received 51 million exposures to alcohol advertising, with 47% of this exposure occurring during the daytime. Children and adolescents exposure to alcohol advertising was similar to young adults and peaked after 8.30pm. Discussion and Conclusions: Child and adolescent and young adult's exposure to alcohol advertising is high when viewing sport TV in Australia in the daytime and night-time. Current alcohol advertising regulations are not protecting children and adolescents from exposure, particularly in prominent televised sports. The regulations should be changed to reduce children and adolescent excessive exposure to alcohol advertising when watching sport. [Carr S, O'Brien KS, Ferris J, Room R, Livingston M, Vandenberg B, Donovan RJ, Lynott D. Child and adolescent exposure to alcohol advertising in Australia's major televised sports. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:406–411].
Formatted abstract
Introduction and Aims. Exposure to alcohol advertising is associated with greater alcohol consumption in children and adolescents, and alcohol advertising is common in Australian sport. We examine child, adolescent and young adult exposure to alcohol advertising during three televised sports in Australia: Australian Football League (AFL), cricket and the National Rugby League (NRL).

Methods. Alcohol advertising and audience viewing data were purchased for all AFL, cricket and NRL TV programs in Australia for 2012. We estimated children and adolescents (0–17 years) and young adults (18–29 years) exposure to alcohol advertising during AFL, cricket and NRL programs in the daytime (06:00–20:29 h), and night-time (20:30–23:59 h).

Results. There were 3544 alcohol advertisements in AFL (1942), cricket (941) and NRL programs (661), representing 60% of all alcohol advertising in sport TV, and 15% of all alcohol advertisements on Australian TV. These programs had a cumulative audience of 26.9 million children and adolescents, and 32 million young adults. Children and adolescents received 51 million exposures to alcohol advertising, with 47% of this exposure occurring during the daytime. Children and adolescents exposure to alcohol advertising was similar to young adults and peaked after 8.30pm.

Discussion and Conclusions. Child and adolescent and young adult's exposure to alcohol advertising is high when viewing sport TV in Australia in the daytime and night-time. Current alcohol advertising regulations are not protecting children and adolescents from exposure, particularly in prominent televised sports. The regulations should be changed to reduce children and adolescent excessive exposure to alcohol advertising when watching sport.
Keyword Alcohol
Advertising
Sport
Children
TV
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 14 September 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 29 Sep 2015, 18:39:23 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service