PPREMO: A prospective cohort study of preterm infant brain structure and function to predict neurodevelopmental outcome

George, Joanne M., Boyd, Roslyn N., Colditz, Paul B., Rose, Stephen E., Pannek, Kerstin, Fripp, Jurgen, Lingwood, Barbara E., Lai, Melissa M., Kong, Annice HT., Ware, Robert S., Coulthard, Alan, Finn, Christine M. and Bandaranayake, Sasaka E. (2015) PPREMO: A prospective cohort study of preterm infant brain structure and function to predict neurodevelopmental outcome. BMC Pediatrics, 15 123: . doi:10.1186/s12887-015-0439-z


Author George, Joanne M.
Boyd, Roslyn N.
Colditz, Paul B.
Rose, Stephen E.
Pannek, Kerstin
Fripp, Jurgen
Lingwood, Barbara E.
Lai, Melissa M.
Kong, Annice HT.
Ware, Robert S.
Coulthard, Alan
Finn, Christine M.
Bandaranayake, Sasaka E.
Title PPREMO: A prospective cohort study of preterm infant brain structure and function to predict neurodevelopmental outcome
Journal name BMC Pediatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2431
Publication date 2015-09-16
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0439-z
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 123
Total pages 17
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: More than 50 percent of all infants born very preterm will experience significant motor and cognitive impairment. Provision of early intervention is dependent upon accurate, early identification of infants at risk of adverse outcomes. Magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent age combined with General Movements assessment at 12 weeks corrected age is currently the most accurate method for early prediction of cerebral palsy at 12 months corrected age. To date no studies have compared the use of earlier magnetic resonance imaging combined with neuromotor and neurobehavioural assessments (at 30 weeks postmenstrual age) to predict later motor and neurodevelopmental outcomes including cerebral palsy (at 12–24 months corrected age). This study aims to investigate i) the relationship between earlier brain imaging and neuromotor/neurobehavioural assessments at 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age, and ii) their ability to predict motor and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 3 and 12 months corrected age.

Methods/design: This prospective cohort study will recruit 80 preterm infants born ≤30 week’s gestation and a reference group of 20 healthy term born infants from the Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Infants will undergo brain magnetic resonance imaging at approximately 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age to develop our understanding of very early brain structure at 30 weeks and maturation that occurs between 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age. A combination of neurological (Hammersmith Neonatal Neurologic Examination), neuromotor (General Movements, Test of Infant Motor Performance), neurobehavioural (NICU Network Neurobehavioural Scale, Premie-Neuro) and visual assessments will be performed at 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age to improve our understanding of the relationship between brain structure and function. These data will be compared to motor assessments at 12 weeks corrected age and motor and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 12 months corrected age (neurological assessment by paediatrician, Bayley scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Alberta Infant Motor Scale, Neurosensory Motor Developmental Assessment) to differentiate atypical development (including cerebral palsy and/or motor delay).

Discussion: Earlier identification of those very preterm infants at risk of adverse neurodevelopmental and motor outcomes provides an additional period for intervention to optimise outcomes.
Keyword Preterm
Magnetic resonance imaging
Neurological
Neuromotor
Neurobehaviour
Neurodevelopment
Prediction
Outcomes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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