Intersectoral policy for severe and persistent mental illness: review of approaches in a sample of high income countries

Diminic, S., Carstensen, G., Harris, M.G., Reavley, N., Pirkis, J., Meurk, C., Wong, I., Bassilios, B. and Whiteford, H.A. (2015) Intersectoral policy for severe and persistent mental illness: review of approaches in a sample of high income countries. Global Mental Health, 2 e18. doi:10.1017/gmh.2015.16

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Author Diminic, S.
Carstensen, G.
Harris, M.G.
Reavley, N.
Pirkis, J.
Meurk, C.
Wong, I.
Bassilios, B.
Whiteford, H.A.
Title Intersectoral policy for severe and persistent mental illness: review of approaches in a sample of high income countries
Journal name Global Mental Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2054-4251
Publication date 2015-08-24
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1017/gmh.2015.16
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 2
Start page e18
Total pages 18
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background It is increasingly recognised that intersectoral linkages between mental health and other health and support sectors are essential for providing effective care for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. The extent to which intersectoral collaboration and approaches to achieve it are detailed in mental health policy has not yet been systematically examined.

Methods Thirty-eight mental health policy documents from 22 jurisdictions in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Canada were identified via a web search. Information was extracted and synthesised on: the extent to which intersectoral collaboration was an objective or guiding principle of policy; the sectors acknowledged as targets for collaboration; and the characteristics of detailed intersectoral collaboration efforts.

Results Recurring themes in objectives/guiding principles included a whole of government approach, coordination and integration of services, and increased social and economic participation. All jurisdictions acknowledged the importance of intersectoral collaboration, particularly with employment, education, housing, community, criminal justice, drug and alcohol, physical health, Indigenous, disability, emergency and aged care services. However, the level of detail provided varied widely. Where detailed strategies were described, the most common linkage mechanisms were joint service planning through intersectoral coordinating committees or liaison workers, interagency agreements, staff training and joint service provision.

Conclusions Sectors and mechanisms identified for collaboration were largely consistent across jurisdictions. Little information was provided about strategies for accountability, resourcing, monitoring and evaluation of intersectoral collaboration initiatives, highlighting an area for further improvement. Examples of collaboration detailed in the policies provide a useful resource for other countries.
Keyword Intersectoral
Mental health policy
Mental health services
Severe and persistent mental illness
Whole of government
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 28 Sep 2015, 09:31:13 EST by Ms Sandra Diminic on behalf of School of Public Health