Comparing Police and Public Perceptions of a Routine Traffic Encounter

Bates, Lyndel J., Antrobus, Emma, Bennett, Sarah and Martin, Peter (2015) Comparing Police and Public Perceptions of a Routine Traffic Encounter. Police Quarterly, 18 4: 442-468. doi:10.1177/1098611115589290


Author Bates, Lyndel J.
Antrobus, Emma
Bennett, Sarah
Martin, Peter
Title Comparing Police and Public Perceptions of a Routine Traffic Encounter
Journal name Police Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1098-6111
1552-745X
Publication date 2015-12-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1098611115589290
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 442
End page 468
Total pages 27
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Subject 3301 Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
3308 Law
Abstract Police perceptions of procedural justice are less well understood than citizen perceptions. Our paper compares the views of police officers and citizens of a routine Australian policing encounter, the Random Breath Test. We examine perceptions of two versions of their encounter: a business as usual and a more explicitly procedurally just interaction. Our results indicate that the procedurally just version affected the views of police officers, but not drivers, regarding the reasons for conducting Random Breath Tests. It also appears that police officers believe that the encounter has a greater impact on drivers' views than the drivers report themselves. This study has important implications for policing as it demonstrates that incorporating procedural justice within police-citizen interactions affects police officers as well as the citizens. It also highlights the importance of using external (e.g., larger community) measures, in addition to internal measures (e.g., within police organization), when assessing the effectiveness of police organizations to ensure a more complete picture.
Formatted abstract
Police perceptions of procedural justice are less well understood than citizen perceptions. Our paper compares the views of police officers and citizens of a routine Australian policing encounter, the Random Breath Test. We examine perceptions of two versions of their encounter: a business as usual and a more explicitly procedurally just interaction. Our results indicate that the procedurally just version affected the views of police officers, but not drivers, regarding the reasons for conducting Random Breath Tests. It also appears that police officers believe that the encounter has a greater impact on drivers’ views than the drivers report themselves. This study has important implications for policing as it demonstrates that incorporating procedural justice within police-citizen interactions affects police officers as well as the citizens. It also highlights the importance of using external (e.g., larger community) measures, in addition to internal measures (e.g., within police organization), when assessing the effectiveness of police organizations to ensure a more complete picture
Keyword Procedural justice
Trust
Cooperation
Queensland Community Engagement Trial
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 14 Sep 2015, 21:31:34 EST by Emma Antrobus on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research