Body mass index and socioeconomic position are associated with 9-year trajectories of multimorbidity: a population-based study

Jackson, Caroline A., Dobson, Annette, Tooth, Leigh and Mishra, Gita D. (2015) Body mass index and socioeconomic position are associated with 9-year trajectories of multimorbidity: a population-based study. Preventive Medicine, 81 92-98. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.08.013


Author Jackson, Caroline A.
Dobson, Annette
Tooth, Leigh
Mishra, Gita D.
Title Body mass index and socioeconomic position are associated with 9-year trajectories of multimorbidity: a population-based study
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1096-0260
0091-7435
Publication date 2015-12-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.08.013
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 81
Start page 92
End page 98
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Multimorbidity is a growing public health problem and is more common in women than men. However, little is known about multimorbidity trajectories, in terms of the accumulation of disease over time, or about the determinants of these trajectories. We sought to identify lifestyle and socioeconomic factors related to multimorbidity trajectories in mid-aged women. Participants were from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a nationally representative population-based study. We included 4865 women born 1946–51, without chronic disease in 1998, followed triennially for 12 years. We used latent class growth analysis to identify 9-year multimorbidity trajectories and multinomial regression to calculate relative risk ratios (RRRs) for associations between baseline lifestyle and socioeconomic factors and trajectories. We identified five multimorbidity trajectories: ‘no morbidity, constant’; ‘low morbidity, constant’; ‘moderate morbidity, constant’; ‘no morbidity, increasing’; and ‘low morbidity, increasing’. Overweight and obesity were associated with an increased risk of the ‘no morbidity, increasing’ (RRR 1.70, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.50 and 2.69, 95% CI 1.69 to 4.28, respectively) and the ‘low morbidity, increasing’ (RRR 2.57, 95% CI 1.56 to 4.24 and 4.28, 95% CI 2.41 to 7.60, respectively) trajectories, as compared to the ‘no morbidity, constant’ group. Low education and difficulty managing on income were also associated with trajectories of poorer health. Among mid-aged women, overweight/obesity and lower socioeconomic status are major risk factors for trajectories characterised by accumulation of chronic disease. These highlight key target areas for preventive approaches aimed at reducing the risk of accumulation of morbidities in mid-aged women.
Keyword Multimorbidity
Chronic disease
Risk factors
Body mass index
Socioeconomic factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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