Cystic fibrosis-related bone disease in children: Examination of peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) data

Brookes, Denise S. K., Briody, Julie N., Munns, Craig F., Davies, Peter S. W. and Hill, Rebecca J. (2015) Cystic fibrosis-related bone disease in children: Examination of peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) data. Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, 14 5: 668-677. doi:10.1016/j.jcf.2015.04.005


Author Brookes, Denise S. K.
Briody, Julie N.
Munns, Craig F.
Davies, Peter S. W.
Hill, Rebecca J.
Title Cystic fibrosis-related bone disease in children: Examination of peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) data
Journal name Journal of Cystic Fibrosis   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1569-1993
1873-5010
Publication date 2015-05-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jcf.2015.04.005
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 14
Issue 5
Start page 668
End page 677
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2740 Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Abstract Background: The investigation of skeletal health data beyond dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is limited in young individuals with CF. We assessed volumetric bone mineral densities (BMD), and bone and muscle parameters using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) in individuals with CF and controls, 7.00-17.99 years.
Formatted abstract
Background
The investigation of skeletal health data beyond dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is limited in young individuals with CF. We assessed volumetric bone mineral densities (BMD), and bone and muscle parameters using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) in individuals with CF and controls, 7.00–17.99 years.

Methods
Peripheral QCT (XCT 3000, Stratec) measurements were made in 53 individuals with CF and 53 controls. Bone mineral content (BMC), total volumetric BMD (vBMD) and cross sectional area (CSA) of the bone were measured at the 4% and 66% sites of the non-dominant tibia and radius. Additionally, trabecular vBMD and bone strength index (BSIc) were measured at the 4% sites, and cortical vBMD, muscle CSA (mCSA) and strength strain index (SSI) were measured at the 66% sites.

Results
Pre-pubertal males with CF had greater trabecular vBMD (p = 0.01) and total vBMD (p = 0.00) at 4% tibia, and greater total vBMD (p = 0.02) at 4% radius. Pre-pubertal females with CF had greater total vBMD at 66% tibia (p = 0.02) and radius (p = 0.04), and cortical vBMD (p = 0.04) at the radius. At puberty, the CF cohort had less BMC at 4% tibia (males, p = 0.02; females, p = 0.01), and smaller mCSA at 66% tibia (males, p = 0.02; females, p = 0.01). Pubertal CF females had a smaller bone CSA (p = 0.01) at 4% tibia, and lower bone strength (SSI) at the tibia (p = 0.00) and radius (p = 0.05) sites.

Conclusions
Bone strength parameters were not compromised prior to puberty in this CF cohort. At puberty, the bone phenotype changed for this CF cohort, showing several deficits compared to the controls. However, bone strength was adapting to the mechanical demands of the muscle. Altered bone parameters and their implications for lowered bone strength with increased age may be greatly influenced by: the CF cohort remaining smaller for age and/or a reduced bone strain, secondary to reduced muscle force
Keyword Cystic Fibrosis
Bone
Muscle
bone strength
pQCT
Volumetric Bone Mineral Density
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID QCMRI1020
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Sep 2015, 20:53:55 EST by Denise Brookes on behalf of School of Public Health