Farming adaptation to environmental change in coastal Bangladesh: shrimp culture versus crop diversification

Kabir, Md. Jahangir, Cramb, Rob, Alauddin, Mohammad and Roth, Christian (2015) Farming adaptation to environmental change in coastal Bangladesh: shrimp culture versus crop diversification. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 1-22. doi:10.1007/s10668-015-9697-z


Author Kabir, Md. Jahangir
Cramb, Rob
Alauddin, Mohammad
Roth, Christian
Title Farming adaptation to environmental change in coastal Bangladesh: shrimp culture versus crop diversification
Journal name Environment, Development and Sustainability   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1387-585X
1573-2975
Publication date 2015-08-14
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10668-015-9697-z
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Farming in coastal Bangladesh includes rice/shrimp and rice/non-rice cropping systems. The former has been highly profitable but has exacerbated salinization of soil and water. We evaluate the relative profitability, riskiness, and sustainability of the two cropping systems, using data from two coastal villages in Khulna District. Shrimp cultivation was initially very rewarding. However, over 12–15 years, the cropping system experienced declining profitability, increased salinity, and adverse impacts on rice cropping and the local environment. From 2009, farmers adapted the system by changing the pond (gher) infrastructure, adopting delayed planting of a saline-tolerant rice cultivar, flushing out accumulated salt with freshwater during rice cropping, and allowing the soil to dry out after harvesting rice. The budgeting results show that with current management practices, the rice/shrimp system is economically more viable (higher returns to land and labour and less risky) than the rice/non-rice system. Soil analyses showed that while salinity was higher in the gher during the dry season, it was significantly reduced in the wet season and was very similar between the two systems (1–2 dS/m). Hence, as well as being more profitable and less risky, the rice/shrimp system may well be more sustainable than previously observed.
Keyword Coastal zone
Farm budgeting
Rice
Risk analysis
Salinity
Shrimp
Sustainability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2016 Collection
School of Economics Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 01 Sep 2015, 10:22:55 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service