Stereotype threat among women in finance: negative effects on identity, workplace well-being, and recruiting

von Hippel, Courtney, Sekaquaptewa, Denise and McFarlane, Matthew (2015) Stereotype threat among women in finance: negative effects on identity, workplace well-being, and recruiting. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 39 3: 405-414. doi:10.1177/0361684315574501


Author von Hippel, Courtney
Sekaquaptewa, Denise
McFarlane, Matthew
Title Stereotype threat among women in finance: negative effects on identity, workplace well-being, and recruiting
Journal name Psychology of Women Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-6402
0361-6843
Publication date 2015-09-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0361684315574501
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 39
Issue 3
Start page 405
End page 414
Total pages 10
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Because women are in the minority in masculine fields like finance and banking, women in these fields may experience stereotype threat or the concern about being negatively stereotyped in their workplace. Research demonstrates that stereotype threat among women in management and accounting leads to negative job attitudes and intentions to quit via its effects on identity separation, or the perception that one’s gender identity is incompatible with one’s work identity. The current work extends this research to related outcomes among women in finance. In this study, 512 women working in finance completed a survey about their work environment, their well-being at work, and whether they would recommend the field of finance to younger women. Results showed that, to the extent women experienced stereotype threat in their work environment, they reported diminished well-being at work and were less likely to recommend their field to other women, and these outcomes were mediated by identity separation. Recruitment and retention of women into fields where they have been historically underrepresented is key to achieving the “critical mass” of women necessary to reduce perceptions of tokenism as well as stereotyping and devaluing of women. The current work sheds light on psychological factors that affect these outcomes.
Keyword Working women
Stereotype threat
Stereotyped attitudes
Professional identity
Self-concept
Well-being
Role models
Working conditions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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