Infectivity of drosophila C virus following oral delivery in drosophila larvae

Stevanovic, Aleksej L. and Johnson, Karyn N. (2015) Infectivity of drosophila C virus following oral delivery in drosophila larvae. Journal of General Virology, 96 6: 1490-1496. doi:10.1099/vir.0.000068


Author Stevanovic, Aleksej L.
Johnson, Karyn N.
Title Infectivity of drosophila C virus following oral delivery in drosophila larvae
Formatted title
Infectivity of drosophila C virus following oral delivery in drosophila larvae
Journal name Journal of General Virology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1465-2099
0022-1317
Publication date 2015-06-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1099/vir.0.000068
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 96
Issue 6
Start page 1490
End page 1496
Total pages 7
Place of publication Reading, Berks United Kingdom
Publisher Society for General Microbiology
Language eng
Abstract The route of pathogen entry can have a major effect on the ability of a virus to induce a prolific infection, but it can also affect the ability of the host organism to induce an immune response to fight the infection. Transmission of arboviruses that cause serious diseases in humans often begin by an insect ingesting a virus, which then disseminates through the internal organs and tissues and ultimately culminates in virus transmission to a human host. Understanding the effect of a natural route of infection on the host pathogen interaction may facilitate development of approaches to prevent viral dissemination. Drosophila has been a useful model organism for understanding host virus interactions; however, most studies have achieved infection by artificially injecting the virus into the host. Here, we developed a single-stranded quantitative PCR able to detect only actively replicating Drosophila C virus (DCV) to study the effect of viral feeding at the early stages of larval development. Exposure of newly hatched larvae to DCV led to 20% of larvae becoming infected within 12 h post-contamination, and caused a 14 % egg-to-adult mortality. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that it has been shown experimentally that DCV is able to establish a prolific infection following larval feeding. Using these newly developed tools, the results suggest that larvae that become infected die before adult eclosion.
Formatted abstract
The route of pathogen entry can have a major effect on the ability of a virus to induce a prolific infection, but it can also affect the ability of the host organism to induce an immune response to fight the infection. Transmission of arboviruses that cause serious diseases in humans often begin by an insect ingesting a virus, which then disseminates through the internal organs and tissues and ultimately culminates in virus transmission to a human host. Understanding the effect of a natural route of infection on the host–pathogen interaction may facilitate development of approaches to prevent viral dissemination. Drosophila has been a useful model organism for understanding host–virus interactions; however, most studies have achieved infection by artificially injecting the virus into the host. Here, we developed a single-stranded quantitative PCR able to detect only actively replicating Drosophila C virus (DCV) to study the effect of viral feeding at the early stages of larval development. Exposure of newly hatched larvae to DCV led to 20 % of larvae becoming infected within 12 h post-contamination, and caused a 14 % egg-to-adult mortality. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that it has been shown experimentally that DCV is able to establish a prolific infection following larval feeding. Using these newly developed tools, the results suggest that larvae that become infected die before adult eclosion.
Keyword Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Virology
Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Virology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP1092492
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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