Emerging conservation challenges and prospects in an era of offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation

Kark, Salit, Brokovich, Eran, Mazor, Tessa and Levin, Noam (2015) Emerging conservation challenges and prospects in an era of offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation. Conservation Biology, 29 6: 1573-1585. doi:10.1111/cobi.12562


Author Kark, Salit
Brokovich, Eran
Mazor, Tessa
Levin, Noam
Title Emerging conservation challenges and prospects in an era of offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation
Journal name Conservation Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1523-1739
0888-8892
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12562
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 1573
End page 1585
Total pages 13
Place of publication Hoboken NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
2303 Ecology
2309 Nature and Landscape Conservation
Abstract Globally, extensive marine areas important for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning are undergoing exploration and extraction of oil and natural gas resources. Such operations are expanding to previously inaccessible deep waters and other frontier regions, while conservation-related legislation and planning is often lacking. Conservation challenges arising from offshore hydrocarbon development are wide-ranging. These challenges include threats to ecosystems and marine species from oil spills, negative impacts on native biodiversity from invasive species colonizing drilling infrastructure, and increased political conflicts that can delay conservation actions. With mounting offshore operations, conservationists need to urgently consider some possible opportunities that could be leveraged for conservation. Leveraging options, as part of multi-billion dollar marine hydrocarbon operations, include the use of facilities and costly equipment of the deep and ultra-deep hydrocarbon industry for deep-sea conservation research and monitoring and establishing new conservation research, practice, and monitoring funds and environmental offsetting schemes. The conservation community, including conservation scientists, should become more involved in the earliest planning and exploration phases and remain involved throughout the operations so as to influence decision making and promote continuous monitoring of biodiversity and ecosystems. A prompt response by conservation professionals to offshore oil and gas developments can mitigate impacts of future decisions and actions of the industry and governments. New environmental decision support tools can be used to explicitly incorporate the impacts of hydrocarbon operations on biodiversity into marine spatial and conservation plans and thus allow for optimum trade-offs among multiple objectives, costs, and risks.
Keyword Deep sea
Fossil fuels
Hydrocarbons
Marine biodiversity
Marine conservation
Natural gas
Offshore drilling
Oil
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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