Can clinical supervision sustain our workforce in the current healthcare landscape? Findings from a Queensland study of allied health professionals

Saxby, Christine, Wilson, Jill and Newcombe, Peter (2015) Can clinical supervision sustain our workforce in the current healthcare landscape? Findings from a Queensland study of allied health professionals. Australian Health Review, 39 4: 476-482. doi:10.1071/AH14183


Author Saxby, Christine
Wilson, Jill
Newcombe, Peter
Title Can clinical supervision sustain our workforce in the current healthcare landscape? Findings from a Queensland study of allied health professionals
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2015-03-02
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH14183
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 39
Issue 4
Start page 476
End page 482
Total pages 7
Place of publication Clayton, VIC Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Objective. Clinical supervision is widely recognised as a mechanism for providing professional support, professional development and clinical governance for healthcare workers. There have been limited studies about the effectiveness of clinical supervision for allied health and minimal studies conducted within the Australian health context. The aim of the present study was to identify whether clinical supervision was perceived to be effective by allied health professionals and to identify components that contributed to effectiveness. Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire, administered through the health service's intranet.
Formatted abstract
Objective Clinical supervision is widely recognised as a mechanism for providing professional support, professional development and clinical governance for healthcare workers. There have been limited studies about the effectiveness of clinical supervision for allied health and minimal studies conducted within the Australian health context. The aim of the present study was to identify whether clinical supervision was perceived to be effective by allied health professionals and to identify components that contributed to effectiveness. Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire, administered through the health service’s intranet.

Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with community allied health workers (n = 82) 8 months after implementation of structured clinical supervision. Demographic data (age, gender), work-related history (profession employment level, years of experience), and supervision practice (number and length of supervision sessions) were collected through an online survey. The outcome measure, clinical supervision effectiveness, was operationalised using the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale-26 (MCSS-26©). Data were analysed with Pearson correlation (r) and independent sample t-tests (t) with significance set at 0.05 (ie the probability of significant difference set at P < 0.05).

Results The length of the supervision sessions (rs ≥0.44), the number of sessions (rs ≥ 0.35) and the total period supervision had been received (rs ≥ 0.42) were all significantly positively correlated with the MCSS-26© domains of clinical supervision effectiveness. Three individual variables, namely ‘receiving clinical supervision’, ‘having some choice in the allocation of clinical supervisor’ and ‘having a completed clinical supervision agreement’, were also significantly associated with higher total MCSS-26© scores (Ps < 0.014).

Conclusion The results of the study demonstrate that when clinical supervision uses best practice principles, it can provide professional support for allied health workers, even during times of rapid organisational change.

Keyword Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Health Care Sciences & Services
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 29 Jul 2015, 01:00:04 EST by Jill Wilson on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work