Subject-object perceptions of heritage: A framework for the study of contrasting railway heritage regeneration strategies

Taylor, Tamarind and Landorf, Chris (2015) Subject-object perceptions of heritage: A framework for the study of contrasting railway heritage regeneration strategies. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 21 10: 1050-1067. doi:10.1080/13527258.2015.1061582


Author Taylor, Tamarind
Landorf, Chris
Title Subject-object perceptions of heritage: A framework for the study of contrasting railway heritage regeneration strategies
Journal name International Journal of Heritage Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1352-7258
1470-3610
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13527258.2015.1061582
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 10
Start page 1050
End page 1067
Total pages 18
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 1206 Conservation
3316 Cultural Studies
3305 Geography, Planning and Development
1202 History
1409 Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
1209 Museology
Abstract A railway or any other form of heritage site may be perceived as a subject or an object-orientated experience. While the former invites an emotional reaction based on personal association, the later suggests a detached response grounded in a transfer of knowledge. This paper considers the role of heritage legislation in shaping such perceptions. Using archival research and site observations, the paper specifically examines the impact of different State-based heritage legislation on the adoption of contrasting redevelopment and site management strategies at two historic railway workshop complexes in Australia. The two sites are the Eveleigh Railway Workshops in New South Wales where an object-centred approach was adopted, and the Ipswich Workshops in Queensland where a subject-centred approach was employed. Although both sites are comparable in terms of their history, scale and cultural significance, the alternative approaches to redevelopment and management have resulted in different perceptual experiences for visitors. The paper reveals the subliminal impact of heritage legislation and suggests the need to consciously manage perceptual experiences, firstly, as a strategic objective in any redevelopment process and, secondly, as a means to integrating meaningful site-specific interpretation into the longer term management of cultural significance.
Formatted abstract
A railway or any other form of heritage site may be perceived as a subject or an object-orientated experience. While the former invites an emotional reaction based on personal association, the later suggests a detached response grounded in a transfer of knowledge. This paper considers the role of heritage legislation in shaping such perceptions. Using archival research and site observations, the paper specifically examines the impact of different State-based heritage legislation on the adoption of contrasting redevelopment and site management strategies at two historic railway workshop complexes in Australia. The two sites are the Eveleigh Railway Workshops in New South Wales where an object-centred approach was adopted, and the Ipswich Workshops in Queensland where a subject-centred approach was employed. Although both sites are comparable in terms of their history, scale and cultural significance, the alternative approaches to redevelopment and management have resulted in different perceptual experiences for visitors. The paper reveals the subliminal impact of heritage legislation and suggests the need to consciously manage perceptual experiences, firstly, as a strategic objective in any redevelopment process and, secondly, as a means to integrating meaningful site-specific interpretation into the longer term management of cultural significance.
Keyword Industrial heritage
Perceptions of heritage
Australian heritage policy
Eveleigh Railway Workshops
Ipswich Railway Workshops
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ATCH (Architecture Theory History Criticism) Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Architecture Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 22 Jul 2015, 03:52:37 EST by Dr Chris Landorf on behalf of School of Architecture