Contrasting futures for ocean and society from different anthropogenic CO<inf>2</inf> emissions scenarios

Gattuso, J.- P., Magnan, A., Bille, R., Cheung, W. W. L., Howes, E. L., Joos, F., Allemand, D., Bopp, L., Cooley, S. R., Eakin, C. M., Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Kelly, R. P., Portner, H.- O., Rogers, A. D., Baxter, J. M., Laffoley, D., Osborn, D., Rankovic, A., Rochette, J., Sumaila, U. R., Treyer, S. and Turley, C. (2015) Contrasting futures for ocean and society from different anthropogenic CO<inf>2</inf> emissions scenarios. Science, 349 6243: 45-+. doi:10.1126/science.aac4722


Author Gattuso, J.- P.
Magnan, A.
Bille, R.
Cheung, W. W. L.
Howes, E. L.
Joos, F.
Allemand, D.
Bopp, L.
Cooley, S. R.
Eakin, C. M.
Hoegh-Guldberg, O.
Kelly, R. P.
Portner, H.- O.
Rogers, A. D.
Baxter, J. M.
Laffoley, D.
Osborn, D.
Rankovic, A.
Rochette, J.
Sumaila, U. R.
Treyer, S.
Turley, C.
Title Contrasting futures for ocean and society from different anthropogenic CO2 emissions scenarios
Journal name Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-9203
0036-8075
Publication date 2015-07-03
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1126/science.aac4722
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 349
Issue 6243
Start page 45
End page +
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, United States
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Language eng
Subject 1000 General
Abstract The ocean moderates anthropogenic climate change at the cost of profound alterations of its physics, chemistry, ecology, and services. Here, we evaluate and compare the risks of impacts on marine and coastal ecosystems - and the goods and services they provide - for growing cumulative carbon emissions under two contrasting emissions scenarios. The current emissions trajectory would rapidly and significantly alter many ecosystems and the associated services on which humans heavily depend. A reduced emissions scenario - consistent with the Copenhagen Accord's goal of a global temperature increase of less than 2°C - is much more favorable to the ocean but still substantially alters important marine ecosystems and associated goods and services. The management options to address ocean impacts narrow as the ocean warms and acidifies. Consequently, any new climate regime that fails to minimize ocean impacts would be incomplete and inadequate.
Formatted abstract
The ocean moderates anthropogenic climate change at the cost of profound alterations of its physics, chemistry, ecology, and services. Here, we evaluate and compare the risks of impacts on marine and coastal ecosystems—and the goods and services they provide—for growing cumulative carbon emissions under two contrasting emissions scenarios. The current emissions trajectory would rapidly and significantly alter many ecosystems and the associated services on which humans heavily depend. A reduced emissions scenario—consistent with the Copenhagen Accord’s goal of a global temperature increase of less than 2°C—is much more favorable to the ocean but still substantially alters important marine ecosystems and associated goods and services. The management options to address ocean impacts narrow as the ocean warms and acidifies. Consequently, any new climate regime that fails to minimize ocean impacts would be incomplete and inadequate.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 165 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 133 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 21 Jul 2015, 10:19:57 EST by System User on behalf of Global Change Institute