Screening mammography uptake within Australia and Scotland in rural and urban populations

Leung, Janni, Macleod, Catriona, McLaughlin, Deirdre, Woods, Laura M., Henderson, Robert, Watson, Angus, Kyle, Richard G., Hubbard, Gill, Mullen, Russell and Atherton, Iain (2015) Screening mammography uptake within Australia and Scotland in rural and urban populations. Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 559-562. doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.06.014

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Author Leung, Janni
Macleod, Catriona
McLaughlin, Deirdre
Woods, Laura M.
Henderson, Robert
Watson, Angus
Kyle, Richard G.
Hubbard, Gill
Mullen, Russell
Atherton, Iain
Title Screening mammography uptake within Australia and Scotland in rural and urban populations
Journal name Preventive Medicine Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2211-3355
Publication date 2015-06-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.06.014
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2
Start page 559
End page 562
Total pages 4
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 2718 Health Informatics
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Objective: To test the hypothesis that rural populations had lower uptake of screening mammography than urban populations in the Scottish and Australian setting. Method: Scottish data are based upon information from the Scottish Breast Screening Programme Information System describing uptake among women residing within the NHS Highland Health Board area who were invited to attend for screening during the 2008 to 2010 round (N = 27,416). Australian data were drawn from the 2010 survey of the 1946-51 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (N = 9890 women). Results: Contrary to our hypothesis, results indicated that women living in rural areas were not less likely to attend for screening mammography compared to women living in urban areas in both Scotland (OR for rural = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06-1.29) and Australia (OR for rural = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.01-1.31). Conclusions: The absence of rural-urban differences in attendance at screening mammography demonstrates that rurality is not necessarily an insurmountable barrier to screening mammography.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To test the hypothesis that rural populations had lower uptake of screening mammography than urban populations in the Scottish and Australian setting.

Method: Scottish data are based upon information from the Scottish Breast Screening Programme Information System describing uptake among women residing within the NHS Highland Health Board area who were invited to attend for screening during the 2008 to 2010 round (N = 27,416). Australian data were drawn from the 2010 survey of the 1946-51 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (N = 9890 women).

Results: Contrary to our hypothesis, results indicated that women living in rural areas were not less likely to attend for screening mammography compared to women living in urban areas in both Scotland (OR for rural = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06-1.29) and Australia (OR for rural = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.01-1.31).

Conclusions: The absence of rural-urban differences in attendance at screening mammography demonstrates that rurality is not necessarily an insurmountable barrier to screening mammography.
Keyword Australia
Breast neoplasms
Early detection of cancer
Health services
Health services accessibility
Healthcare disparities
Rural health
Rural health services
Rural population
Scotland
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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