Ganguroo robustiter, sp. nov. (Macropodoidea, Marsupialia), a middle to early late Miocene basal macropodid from Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Australia

Cooke, Bernard N., Travouillon, Kenny J., Archer, Michael and Hand, Suzanne J. (2015) Ganguroo robustiter, sp. nov. (Macropodoidea, Marsupialia), a middle to early late Miocene basal macropodid from Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 35 4: e956879-1-e956879-22. doi:10.1080/02724634.2015.956879


Author Cooke, Bernard N.
Travouillon, Kenny J.
Archer, Michael
Hand, Suzanne J.
Title Ganguroo robustiter, sp. nov. (Macropodoidea, Marsupialia), a middle to early late Miocene basal macropodid from Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Australia
Formatted title
Ganguroo robustiter, sp. nov. (Macropodoidea, Marsupialia), a middle to early late Miocene basal macropodid from Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Australia
Journal name Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1937-2809
0272-4634
Publication date 2015-06-19
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02724634.2015.956879
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 35
Issue 4
Start page e956879-1
End page e956879-22
Total pages 22
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Cranial and dental remains of the middle to early late Miocene macropodid kangaroo, Ganguroo robustiter, sp. nov., are described. Postcranial remains of G. robustiter were previously described as referable to G. bilamina. Ganguroo robustiter is more robust (approximately 20% larger) and more derived than G. bilamina and G. bites, in having a larger m4, a well-developed posterolingual ridge and lingual cingulum on P3, a longer P3/p3, and no stylar cusp C on M3–M4. We used previously published data matrices to analyze the phylogenetic relationship of G. robustiter. Both phylogenetic analyses, using craniodental and postcranial characters, place G. robustiter within Macropodidae, as the sister taxon to sthenurines and macropodines. Species of Ganguroo are not found to be monophyletic despite their extreme similarity in character scores. This may be due to the large amount of missing data for G. bilamina and G. bites for which no postcranial remains have been identified. Phylogenetic results are ambiguous, recovering unresolved trees with low bootstrap values, but the generic assignment of these taxa is maintained because they are remarkably similar. Species of Ganguroo may represent a phyletic lineage, with species increasing in size and losing cusp/cuspids on their premolars through time, which appears to coincide with a broader record of changing vegetation and climates through the middle Miocene.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Papers
Official 2016 Collection
 
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