Elaborative encoding through self-generation enhances outcomes with errorless learning: findings from the Skypekids memory study

Haslam, Catherine, Wagner, Joseph, Wegener, Signy and Malouf, Tania (2015) Elaborative encoding through self-generation enhances outcomes with errorless learning: findings from the Skypekids memory study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 1-20. doi:10.1080/09602011.2015.1053947


Author Haslam, Catherine
Wagner, Joseph
Wegener, Signy
Malouf, Tania
Title Elaborative encoding through self-generation enhances outcomes with errorless learning: findings from the Skypekids memory study
Journal name Neuropsychological Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-0694
0960-2011
Publication date 2015-06-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09602011.2015.1053947
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Errorless learning has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of memory impairment in adults and older adults with acquired brain injury. In the same population, use of elaborative encoding through supported self-generation in errorless paradigms has been shown to further enhance memory performance. However, the evidence base relevant to application of both standard and self-generation forms of errorless learning in children is far weaker. We address this limitation in the present study to examine recall performance in children with brain injury (n = 16) who were taught novel age-appropriate science and social science facts through the medium of Skype. All participants were taught these facts under conditions of standard errorless learning, errorless learning with self-generation, and trial-and-error learning after which memory was tested at 5-minute, 30-minute, 1-hour and 24-hour delays. Analysis revealed no main effect of time, with participants retaining most information acquired over the 24-hour testing period, but a significant effect of condition. Notably, self-generation proved more effective than both standard errorless and trial-and-error learning. Further analysis of the data revealed that severity of attentional impairment was less detrimental to recall performance under errorless conditions. This study extends the literature to provide further evidence of the value of errorless learning methods in children with ABI and the first demonstration of the effectiveness of self-generation when delivered via the Internet.
Keyword Errorless learning
Brain injury
Children
Self-generation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Early view of article. Published online 26 June 2015.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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