The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities

Reef, Ruth, Winter, Klaus, Morales, Jorge, Adame, Maria Fernanda, Reef, Dana L. and Lovelock, Catherine E. (2015) The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities. Physiologia Plantarum, 154 3: 358-368. doi:10.1111/ppl.12289


Author Reef, Ruth
Winter, Klaus
Morales, Jorge
Adame, Maria Fernanda
Reef, Dana L.
Lovelock, Catherine E.
Title The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities
Formatted title
The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities
Journal name Physiologia Plantarum   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1399-3054
0031-9317
Publication date 2015-07-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ppl.12289
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 154
Issue 3
Start page 358
End page 368
Total pages 11
Place of publication Hoboken NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1314 Physiology
1311 Genetics
1110 Plant Science
1307 Cell Biology
Abstract By increasing water use efficiency and carbon assimilation, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations could potentially improve plant productivity and growth at high salinities. To assess the effect of elevated CO2 on the salinity response of a woody halophyte, we grew seedlings of the mangrove Avicennia germinans under a combination of five salinity treatments [from 5 to 65 parts per thousand (ppt)] and three CO2 concentrations (280, 400 and 800ppm). We measured survivorship, growth rate, photosynthetic gas exchange, root architecture and foliar nutrient and ion concentrations. The salinity optima for growth shifted higher with increasing concentrations of CO2, from 0ppt at 280ppm to 35ppt at 800ppm. At optimal salinity conditions, carbon assimilation rates were significantly higher under elevated CO2 concentrations. However, at salinities above the salinity optima, salinity had an expected negative effect on mangrove growth and carbon assimilation, which was not alleviated by elevated CO2, despite a significant improvement in photosynthetic water use efficiency. This is likely due to non-stomatal limitations to growth at high salinities, as indicated by our measurements of foliar ion concentrations that show a displacement of K+ by Na+ at elevated salinities that is not affected by CO2. The observed shift in the optimal salinity for growth with increasing CO2 concentrations changes the fundamental niche of this species and could have significant effects on future mangrove distribution patterns and interspecific interactions.
Formatted abstract
By increasing water use efficiency and carbon assimilation, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations could potentially improve plant productivity and growth at high salinities. To assess the effect of elevated CO2 on the salinity response of a woody halophyte, we grew seedlings of the mangrove Avicennia germinans under a combination of five salinity treatments [from 5 to 65 parts per thousand (ppt)] and three CO2 concentrations (280, 400 and 800 ppm). We measured survivorship, growth rate, photosynthetic gas exchange, root architecture and foliar nutrient and ion concentrations. The salinity optima for growth shifted higher with increasing concentrations of CO2, from 0 ppt at 280 ppm to 35 ppt at 800 ppm. At optimal salinity conditions, carbon assimilation rates were significantly higher under elevated CO2 concentrations. However, at salinities above the salinity optima, salinity had an expected negative effect on mangrove growth and carbon assimilation, which was not alleviated by elevated CO2, despite a significant improvement in photosynthetic water use efficiency. This is likely due to non-stomatal limitations to growth at high salinities, as indicated by our measurements of foliar ion concentrations that show a displacement of K+ by Na+ at elevated salinities that is not affected by CO2. The observed shift in the optimal salinity for growth with increasing CO2 concentrations changes the fundamental niche of this species and could have significant effects on future mangrove distribution patterns and interspecific interactions.
Keyword Plant Sciences
Plant Sciences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DE120101706
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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