Natural in situ relationships suggest coral reef calcium carbonate production will decline with ocean acidification

Shaw, Emily C., Phinn, Stuart R., Tilbrook, Bronte and Steven, Andy (2015) Natural in situ relationships suggest coral reef calcium carbonate production will decline with ocean acidification. Limnology and Oceanography, 60 3: 777-788. doi:10.1002/lno.10048

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Author Shaw, Emily C.
Phinn, Stuart R.
Tilbrook, Bronte
Steven, Andy
Title Natural in situ relationships suggest coral reef calcium carbonate production will decline with ocean acidification
Journal name Limnology and Oceanography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0024-3590
1939-5590
1939-5604
Publication date 2015-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/lno.10048
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 60
Issue 3
Start page 777
End page 788
Total pages 12
Place of publication Waco, TX, United States
Publisher American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
There are few in situ studies showing how net community calcification (Gnet) of coral reefs is related to carbonate chemistry, and the studies to date have demonstrated different predicted rates of change. In this study, we measured net community production (Pnet), Gnet, and carbonate chemistry of a reef flat at One Tree Island, Great Barrier Reef. Diurnal pCO2 variability of 289–724 μatm was driven primarily by photosynthesis and respiration. The reef flat was found to be net autotrophic, with daily production of ∼ 35 mmol C m−2 d−1 and net calcification of ∼ 33 mmol C m−2 d−1. Gnet was strongly related to Pnet, which drove a hysteresis pattern in the relationship between Gnet and aragonite saturation state (Ωar). Although Pnet was the main driver of Gnet, Ωar was still an important factor, where 95% of the variance in Gnet could be described by Pnet and Ωar. Based on the observed in situ relationship, Gnet would be expected to reach zero when Ωar is ∼ 2.5. It is unknown what proportion of a decline in Gnet would be through reduced calcification and what would occur through increased dissolution, but the results here support predictions that overall calcium carbonate production will decline in coral reefs as a result of ocean acidification.
Keyword Buffer capacity
Diurnal changes
Wind speed
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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